arrow-right cart chevron-down chevron-left chevron-right chevron-up close menu minus play plus search share user email pinterest facebook instagram snapchat tumblr twitter vimeo youtube subscribe dogecoin dwolla forbrugsforeningen litecoin amazon_payments american_express bitcoin cirrus discover fancy interac jcb master paypal stripe visa diners_club dankort maestro trash

Shopping Cart


Virtual Author Talk: Clint Smith in Conversation with Jeffrey Page - September 20 at 7 PM CST
Regular price
$32.95

Virtual Author Talk: Clint Smith in Conversation with Jeffrey Page - September 20 at 7 PM CST


Unit price per

Presented in partnership with Project Row Houses

Join us for a virtual author talk in celebration of Clint Smith's newest book, How the Word is Passed: A Reckoning With the History of Slavery Across America, which debuted as a #1 New York Times Bestseller. This conversation will be moderated by Clint's former history teacher, Mr. Jeffrey Page.  

Event Deets:

When: Monday, September 20 at 7:00 pm CST

Where: Virtual via Crowdcast

How:  Registration is required by adding a ticket to your cart and checking out.  You have the option to grab a ticket for free, make a donation with your ticket, or purchase the book together with the ticket. 

We hope to see you there!

About the Book:

Beginning in his own hometown of New Orleans, Clint Smith leads the reader through an unforgettable tour of monuments and landmarks—those that are honest about the past and those that are not—that offer an intergenerational story of how slavery has been central in shaping our nation’s collective history, and ourselves.

It is the story of the Monticello Plantation in Virginia, the estate where Thomas Jefferson wrote letters espousing the urgent need for liberty while enslaving over 400 people on the premises. It is the story of the Whitney Plantation, one of the only former plantations devoted to preserving the experience of the enslaved people whose lives and work sustained it. It is the story of Angola, a former plantation-turned maximum security prison in Louisiana that is filled with Black men who work across the 18,000-acre land for virtually no pay. And it is the story of Blandford Cemetery, the final resting place of tens of thousands of Confederate soldiers.

In a deeply researched and transporting exploration of the legacy of slavery and its imprint on centuries of American history, How the Word Is Passed illustrates how some of our country’s most essential stories are hidden in plain view-whether in places we might drive by on our way to work, holidays such as Juneteenth, or entire neighborhoods—like downtown Manhattan—on which the brutal history of the trade in enslaved men, women and children has been deeply imprinted.

Informed by scholarship and brought alive by the story of people living today, Clint Smith’s debut work of nonfiction is a landmark work of reflection and insight that offers a new understanding of the hopeful role that memory and history can play in making sense of our country and how it has come to be.

About the Author:

Clint Smith is a staff writer at The Atlantic and the author of the poetry collection Counting Descent. The book won the 2017 Literary Award for Best Poetry Book from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association and was a finalist for an NAACP Image Award. He has received fellowships from New America, the Emerson Collective, the Art For Justice Fund, Cave Canem, and the National Science Foundation. His writing has been published in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Poetry Magazine, The Paris Review and elsewhere. Born and raised in New Orleans, he received his B.A. in English from Davidson College and his Ph.D. in Education from Harvard University.

About the Moderator:

Jeffrey Page is a native of Detroit, Michigan. He recently retired from The Awty International School where he taught History and Global Politics beginning in 2004. He has also served as an Adjunct Instructor of History at Texas Southern University and Houston Community College. In addition, he was an administrator at the Texas Department of Protective and Regulatory Services (Children's Protective Services), served as the Assistant Director of Children’s Division of the Mental Health Mental Retardation Authority of Harris County Texas, and has worked at Memorial Hermann Heights Hospital as a Medical Social Worker. He also worked as a Hospice Social Worker at the Hospice at the Texas Medical Center.

About Project Row Houses:

Project Row Houses is a community platform that enriches lives through art with an emphasis on cultural identity and its impact on the urban landscape. We engage neighbors, artists, and enterprises in collective creative action to help materialize sustainable opportunities in marginalized communities.

Project Row Houses occupies a significant footprint in Houston’s Historic Third Ward, one of the city’s oldest African-American neighborhoods. The site encompasses five city blocks and houses 39 structures that serve as home base to a variety of community-enriching initiatives, art programs, and neighborhood development activities. PRH programs touch the lives of under-resourced neighbors, young single mothers with the ambition of a better life for themselves and their children, small enterprises with the drive to take their businesses to the next level, and artists interested in using their talents to understand and enrich the lives of others. Although PRH’s African-American roots are planted deeply in Third Ward, the work of PRH extends far beyond the borders of a neighborhood in transition. The Project Row Houses model for art and social engagement applies not only to Houston, but also to diverse communities around the world.

To learn more or to make a donation to Project Row Houses visit www.projectrowhouses.org