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  • The Anti-Racist Writing Workshop: How To Decolonize the Creative Classroom

    by Felicia Rose Chavez

    $24.95

    This easy-to-use guide explains how to recruit, nourish, and fortify writers of color through innovative reading, writing, workshop, critique, and assessment strategies.

    A captivating mix of memoir and progressive teaching strategies, The Anti-Racist Writing Workshop: How to Decolonize the Creative Classroom demonstrates how to be culturally attuned, twenty-first century educators.

    The Anti-Racist Writing Workshop is a call to create healthy, sustainable, and empowering classroom communities. Award-winning educator Felicia Rose Chavez exposes the invisible politics of power and privilege that have silenced writers of color for far too long. It’s more urgent than ever that we consciously work against traditions of dominance in the classroom, but what specific actions can we take to achieve authentically inclusive communities? Together, we will address how to:

    · Deconstruct our biases to achieve a cultural shift in perspective.

    · Design a democratic teaching model to create safe spaces for creative concentration.

    · Recruit, nourish, and fortify students of color to best empower them to exercise voice.

    · Embolden our students to self-advocate as responsible citizens in a globalized community.

    Finally, a teaching model that protects and platforms students of color, because every writer deserves access to a public voice. For anyone looking to liberate their thinking from “the way it’s always been done,” The Anti-Racist Writing Workshop is a clear, compelling guidebook on a necessary step forward.

  • Black Friend : Essays

    by Ziwe

    $26.00
    From the writer crowned one of the smartest, funniest voices in modern America, this hotly anticipated debut collection of essays offers “a precious glimpse into how Ziwe’s uniquely fearless mind functions” (New York Magazine)

    Ziwe made a name for herself by asking guests like Alyssa Milano, Fran Lebowitz, and Chet Hanks direct questions. In Black Friend, she turns her incisive perspective on both herself and the culture at large. Throughout the book, Ziwe combines pop-culture commentary and personal stories, which grapple with her own (mis)understanding of identity. From a hilarious case of mistaken identity via a jumbotron to a terrifying fight-or-flight encounter in the woods, Ziwe raises difficult questions for comedic relief.

    From Black Friend’s Introduction:

    “Today, I learned that my book is ranked as the #1 new release in ‘Discrimination and Racism’ on Amazon. Wow. This is a huge honor, especially considering my stiff competition in the self-published manifestos space. Unfortunately, this victory is bittersweet. I worry that people may get the wrong idea and think that I am pro-racism when in actuality, I am indifferent. Still, I’d love to thank everyone who made this possible. I solemnly swear to write the most discriminatory book in American history. I hope I can make you proud.

    “Just kidding . . . I will not marginalize you . . . unless that’s your kink. This book of essays offers moments of extreme discomfort (and the subsequent growth) in my life around the role of ‘black friend.’ Black friends come in all shapes and sizes. Yet the archetype is often a two-dimensional character meant to support the non-black protagonists’ more complex humanity. Some black friends exist as the comic relief, like Donkey in any of the Shrek movies. Some are the sassy friend, like Louise from St. Louis in Sex and the City. Still others are the inexplicably sagacious companion, like Morpheus in The Matrix. It’s impossible for these individual portraits to reflect my complicated reality. To start, they are fictional. One of them is a talking ass. I do not exist just to move plot. While I am a supportive friend, I am not a supporting character. I am the protagonist of my perfectly imperfect story.”
  • A Terrible Thing to Waste: Environmental Racism and Its Assault on the American Mind

    by Harriet A. Washington

    $19.99
    A "powerful and indispensable" look at the devastating consequences of environmental racism (Gerald Markowitz) and what we can do to remedy its toxic effects on marginalized communities -- featuring a new preface on COVID-19 risk factors.
     
    Did you know...
     
    • Middle-class African American households with incomes between $50,000 and $60,000 live in neighborhoods that are more polluted than those of very poor white households with incomes below $10,000.
    • When swallowed, a lead-paint chip no larger than a fingernail can send a toddler into a coma -- one-tenth of that amount will lower his IQ.
    • Nearly two of every five African American homes in Baltimore are plagued by lead-based paint. Almost all of the 37,500 Baltimore children who suffered lead poisoning between 2003 and 2015 were African American.
     
    From injuries caused by lead poisoning to the devastating effects of atmospheric pollution, infectious disease, and industrial waste, Americans of color are harmed by environmental hazards in staggeringly disproportionate numbers. This systemic onslaught of toxic exposure and institutional negligence causes irreparable physical harm to millions of people across the country-cutting lives tragically short and needlessly burdening our health care system. But these deadly environments create another insidious and often overlooked consequence: robbing communities of color, and America as a whole, of intellectual power.
     
    The 1994 publication of The Bell Curve and its controversial thesis catapulted the topic of genetic racial differences in IQ to the forefront of a renewed and heated debate. Now, in A Terrible Thing to Waste, award-winning science writer Harriet A. Washington adds her incisive analysis to the fray, arguing that IQ is a biased and flawed metric, but that it is useful for tracking cognitive damage. She takes apart the spurious notion of intelligence as an inherited trait, using copious data that instead point to a different cause of the reported African American-white IQ gap: environmental racism - a confluence of racism and other institutional factors that relegate marginalized communities to living and working near sites of toxic waste, pollution, and insufficient sanitation services. She investigates heavy metals, neurotoxins, deficient prenatal care, bad nutrition, and even pathogens as chief agents influencing intelligence to explain why communities of color are disproportionately affected -- and what can be done to remedy this devastating problem.
     
    Featuring extensive scientific research and Washington's sharp, lively reporting, A Terrible Thing to Waste is sure to outrage, transform the conversation, and inspire debate.
  • The Anti-Racist Vocab Guide: An Illustrated Introduction to Dismantling Anti-Blackness

    by Maya Ealey

    $18.95

    *Ships in 7-10 Business Days*

    From "Assimilation" to "Decolonization," "Black Wall Street" to "Police Brutality," and "Colorism" to "White Supremacy," this book equips you with the language to engage in crucial conversations around anti-Black racism.

    The Anti-Racist Vocab Guide is a boldly illustrated visual glossary that distills complex subjects into comprehensive yet accessible definitions of terms and provides concise and insightful explanations of historical moments. With reflection questions to use for introspection or as a starting point for hard conversations with those close to you, this book will encourage both your learning and unlearning—no matter where you are in your journey to understanding race in America.

    THOROUGH AND APPROACHABLE: This book presents huge topics in easy-to-understand language that welcomes readers of every experience.

    REFLECTION QUESTIONS: Each entry is followed by questions to encourage readers to continue their education and translate their new understanding into positive action in their daily lives.

    BEYOND THE BUZZWORDS: This is an invaluable resource guide that breaks down and goes beyond common phrases to provide actionable awareness.

    EVOCATIVE ART: Author Maya Ealey's striking art provides conceptual illustrations of each term explained in the book in her bold, passionate style.

    Perfect for:

    • Anyone interested in learning more about race in America
    • People who want help understanding the complicated subject of racism
    • Parents, teachers, and students
    • Readers of instructive and informative best sellers such as How to Be an Antiracist, White Fragility, The 1619 Project, and Do the Work!: An Antiracist Activity Book
  • The Antiracist Kid: A Book About Identity, Justice, and Activism

    by Tiffany Jewell

    $9.99

    Now available in paperback from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of This Book Is Anti-Racist, Tiffany Jewell, The Antiracist Kid is the essential guide to antiracism for empowering young readers, with vibrant art by Eisner-nominated illustrator Nicole Miles!

    What is racism? What is antiracism? Why are both important to learn about? In this book, systemic racism and the antiracist tools to fight it are easily accessible to young readers.

    In three sections, this must-have guide explains:

    • Identity: What it is and how it applies to you
    • Justice: What it is, what racism has to do with it, and how to address injustice
    • Activism: A how-to with resources to be the best antiracist kid you can be

    This book teaches young children the words, language, and methods to recognize racism and injustice—and what to do when they encounter it at home, at school, and in the media they watch, play, and read.

  • The Other: How to Own Your Power at Work as a Woman of Color

    by Daniela Pierre-Bravo

    $18.99

    *ships in 7-10 business days*

    Do you know that feeling of "not belonging" when you have so much to say at a work meeting? Of being a "yes-girl" but getting passed up for promotions?

    For women of color and children of immigrants, who are the “the other” at work, there's a different threshold of belonging that creates a false feeling of inadequacy. It can lead to being overwhelmed, overworked, and overlooked. The Other shatters the unspoken expectations for you to stay in your lane and gives you the tools to build unshakable confidence and a career that excels--on your own terms.  

    Bestselling author and MSNBC reporter Daniela-Pierre Bravo spent many years undocumented and in the shadows as an immigrant from Chile, working odd jobs to pay her way through school. Like many other women of color she became an expert shape shifter in order to chameleon her way around professional environments that felt out of reach. When Daniela became a DACA recipient, she finally felt that she’d made it, rising through the ranks in her career. But she quickly realized that no matter how much success she achieved, she always felt she had to prove her worth as “the other.”

    In The Other, Daniela shares her journey and those of other women to help you recognize your power in the workplace outside of the white gaze. She drives you to reshape the way you think about career advancement without losing your sense of identity and helps you see how to use your differences as an advantage. Smart, revealing, and loaded with practical steps, The Other is a framework for how to effectively advocate for yourself, become your biggest believer, claim the spaces in your career that are rightfully yours.
     

  • Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge
    $18.00

    Award-winning journalist Reni Eddo-Lodge was frustrated with the way that discussions of race and racism are so often led by those blind to it, by those willfully ignorant of its legacy. Her response, Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race, has transformed the conversation both in Britain and around the world. Examining everything from eradicated black history to the political purpose of white dominance, from whitewashed feminism to the inextricable link between class and race, Eddo-Lodge offers a timely and essential new framework for how to see, acknowledge, and counter racism. Including a new afterword by the author, this is a searing, illuminating, absolutely necessary exploration of what it is to be a person of color in Britain today, and an essential handbook for anyone looking to understand how structural racism works.

  • How We Fight White Supremacy: A Field Guide to Black Resistance

    by Akiba Solomon & Kenrya Rankin

    $17.99
    This celebration of Black resistance, from protests to art to sermons to joy, offers a blueprint for the fight for freedom and justice -- and ideas for how each of us can contribute

    Many of us are facing unprecedented attacks on our democracy, our privacy, and our hard-won civil rights. If you're Black in the US, this is not new. As Colorlines editors Akiba Solomon and Kenrya Rankin show, Black Americans subvert and resist life-threatening forces as a matter of course. In these pages, leading organizers, artists, journalists, comedians, and filmmakers offer wisdom on how they fight White supremacy. It's a must-read for anyone new to resistance work, and for the next generation of leaders building a better future.

    Featuring contributions from:
    • Ta-Nehisi Coates
    • Tarana Burke
    • Harry Belafonte
    • Adrienne Maree brown
    • Alicia Garza
    • Patrisse Khan-Cullors
    • Reverend Dr. Valerie Bridgeman
    • Kiese Laymon
    • Jamilah Lemieux
    • Robin DG Kelley
    • Damon Young
    • Michael Arceneaux
    • Hanif Abdurraqib
    • Dr. Yaba Blay
    • Diamond Stingily
    • Amanda Seales
    • Imani Perry
    • Denene Millner
    • Kierna Mayo
    • John Jennings
    • Dr. Joy Harden Bradford
    • Tongo Eisen-Martin
  • Racial Justice at Work: Practical Solutions for Systemic Change by Mary Frances Winters & The Winters Group Team
    $24.95
    Creating justice-centered organizations is the next frontier in DEI. This book shows how to go beyond compliance to address harm, share power, and create equity.

    Traditional DEI work has not succeeded at dismantling systems that perpetuate harm and exclude BIPOC groups. Proponents of DEI have put too much focus on HR solutions, such as increasing representation, and not enough emphasis on changing the deeper organizational systems that perpetuate inequities—in other words, on justice. DEIJ work diverges from traditional metrics-driven DEI work and requires a new approach to effectively dismantle power structures.

    This thought-provoking, solutions-oriented book offers strategic advice on how to adopt a justice mindset, anticipate and address resistance, shift power dynamics, and create a psychologically safe organizational culture. Individual chapters provide pragmatic how-to guides to implementing justice-centered practices in recruitment and hiring, data collection and analysis, learning and development, marketing and advertising, procurement, philanthropy, and more.

    DEIJ pioneer Mary-Frances Winters and her coauthors address some of the most significant aspects of adding a justice focus to diversity work, showing how to create a workplace culture where equity is not a checklist of performative actions but a lived reality.
  • Better Than We Found It: Conversations to Help Save the World

    by Frederick Joseph and Porsche Joseph

    $19.99

    *ships/available for pickup in 7-10 business days

    Every generation inherits the problems created by the ones before them, but no generation will inherit as many problems—as many crises—as the current generation of young people. From the devastations of climate change to the horrors of gun violence, from rampant transphobia to the widening wealth gap, from the lack of health care to the lack of housing, the challenges facing the next generation can feel insurmountable. But change, even revolution, is possible; you just have to know where to start. In Better Than We Found It, best-selling author Frederick Joseph and debut author Porsche Joseph make the case for addressing some of the biggest issues of our day. Featuring more than two dozen interviews with prominent activists, authors, actors, and politicians, this is the essential resource for those who want to make the world better than we found it.

  • The Black Friend: On Being a Better White Person

    by Frederick Jospeh

    $12.00
    *Ships in 7-10 Business Days*
    “We don’t see color.” “I didn’t know Black people liked Star Wars!” “What hood are you from?” As a student in a largely white high school, Frederick Joseph often simply let wince-worthy moments go. When he grew older, he saw them as missed opportunities to stand up for himself and bring awareness to those who didn’t see the hurt they caused. Here, Joseph speaks to the reader as he wishes he’d spoken to his friends, unpacking hurtful race-related anecdotes from his past and sharing how he might handle things differently now. Each chapter also features the voice and experience of an artist or activist, including Angie Thomas, author of The Hate U Give; April Reign, creator of #OscarsSoWhite; and Jemele Hill, sports journalist and podcast host. From cultural appropriation to power dynamics, “reverse racism” to white privilege, this book is a conversation starter, tool kit, and window into the life of a former “token Black kid.” Back matter includes an encyclopedia of racism, including details on historical events and terminology.
  • IRL Author Talk: How to Be a (Young) Antiracist with Dr. Ibram X. Kendi and Nic Stone - Feb 2 @ 6:30 PM
    Sold out
    We are extremely honored to present Dr. Ibram X. Kendi and Nic Stone for an in-person author talk moderated by Britt Hawthorne as they discuss their newest book, How to Be a (Young) Antiracist, on Thursday, February 2, 2023, at 6:30 PM in the Reading Room at the Julia Ideson Building at the Houston Public Library Downtown.  
     
    This program is being sponsored by the wonderful folks at the ACLU of Texas.
     
    Event Deets:
     
    What: How to Be a (Young) Antiracist with Dr. Ibram X. Kendi and Nic Stone
    When:  Thursday, February 2 at 6:30 PM CST
    Where: The Reading Room at the Julia Ideson Building at the Houston Public Library Downtown (550 McKinney St, Houston, TX 77002)
    How:  Tickets are $26 via Eventbrite and include one copy of How to Be a (Young) Antiracist
     
    About the Event:
     
    Bestselling authors Dr. Ibram X. Kendi and Nic Stone have crafted the perfect guide for teens seeking a way to help create a more just society in How to Be a (Young) Antiracist. Based on Dr. Kendi’s groundbreaking How to Be an Antiracist, this dynamic reframing puts young adulthood front and center, encouraging and inspiring readers to think critically about how they engage in the world around them. 
     
    Through the narration of acclaimed author Nic Stone, readers of How to Be a (Young) Antiracist follow a young Ibram as he learns (and unlearns) lessons that shape his understanding of racism. The result is an impactful non-fiction account that weaves history, science, law, and personal stories from Dr. Kendi and Nic to help teens understand complicated concepts about race and start them on their own antiracist journeys. How to Be a (Young) Antiracist offers an innovative framework specifically for teens that empowers them to reassess what it means to live and act in a manner that dismantles racism.
     
    Each ticket includes one copy of How to Be a (Young) Antiracist  and will be available for pick-up at the event. The accompanying workbook, The (Young) Antiracist’s Workbook, is available for purchase with your ticket (see add-on options) and will be on sale at the event.
  • The (Young) Antiracist's Workbook: Questions for Changemakers by Ibram X. Kendi
    $15.00

    Kids 12 and up can discover ways to work toward a better future in this illustrated workbook guiding them to reflect on their understanding of race—from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of How to Be an Antiracist.

    Antiracism is not a destination but a journey—one that takes deliberate, consistent work. Dr. Ibram X. Kendi's concept of antiracism has changed the way we talk about race, equality, and justice in America, pointing us toward new ways of thinking about ourselves and our society. Young people must be included in conversations on race, which is why Dr. Kendi has created this workbook with bestselling YA author Nic Stone for readers age twelve and up.

    Reflection questions include:  

    • Have you ever tried to change something about yourself to fit in? Did it work? Why or why not?
    • How does the word racist feel when you hear or say it? Is it a weapon or a descriptor? Why?
    • Why is empathy an important tool for any antiracist's toolbox?

    Whether or not you've read How to Be a (Young) Antiracist, this workbook offers the opportunity to reflect on your personal commitment to antiracism and is a log of your journey toward a better future.
  • How to Be a (Young) Antiracist

    by Ibram X. Kendi & Nic Stone

    from $14.99

    The #1 New York Times bestseller that sparked international dialogue is now a book for young adults! Based on the adult bestseller by Ibram X. Kendi, and co-authored by bestselling author Nic Stone, How to be a (Young) Antiracist will serve as a guide for teens seeking a way forward in acknowledging, identifying, and dismantling racism and injustice.

    The New York Times bestseller How to be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi is shaping the way a generation thinks about race and racism. How to be a (Young) Antiracist is a dynamic reframing of the concepts shared in the adult book, with young adulthood front and center. Aimed at readers 12 and up, and co-authored by award-winning children's book author Nic Stone, How to be a (Young) Antiracist empowers teen readers to help create a more just society. Antiracism is a journey--and now young adults will have a map to carve their own path. Kendi and Stone have revised this work to provide anecdotes and data that speaks directly to the experiences and concerns of younger readers, encouraging them to think critically and build a more equitable world in doing so.

  • White Fear: How the Browning of America Is Making White Folks Lose Their Minds

    by Roland S. Martin

    $23.95
    White Fear has shaped our democracy and society from the beginning—and today, it’s more intense and visible than ever. To neutralize it, we must first understand it.

    For two centuries, the deep-seated fear that many White people feel—of losing power, of losing economic standing, of losing a particular “way of life”—has been the driving force behind American politics and culture. 
    White Fear enabled the rise of Donald Trump. It’s behind the recent flood of restrictive voting laws disproportionately impacting people of color. It’s why reactions to movements like Black Lives Matter and football players taking a knee have been so negative and so strong.

    As we approach a future where White people will become a racial the minority in the US, something estimated to occur as early as 2043, that fear is only intensifying, festering, and becoming more visible. Are we destined for a violent clash? What can we do to step into our country’s inevitable future, without tearing ourselves apart in the process?

    Nationally renowned journalist and award-winning author Roland Martin has been sounding this alarm for more than a decade. In White Fear, he provides a primer on how White Fear has shaped, and continues to shape, our democracy and our culture. He connects the separate puzzle pieces, from the Tea Party Movement to the decline of White American optimism to the diminishing blue-collar workforce, to illuminate the larger picture of what will unfold in America over the next decade-plus, and offers a better way forward.

    If we want to create the kind of country that we’re all welcome in and proud to live in, we can no longer ignore White Fear. We must learn to recognize, understand, and dismantle it.

    And as the last few years have shown, we don’t have any time to lose.
  • IRL Author Talk: Do the Work with W. Kamau Bell & Kate Schatz- August 17 @ 7:00 PM CST
    Sold out

    Join us an interactive conversation surrounding Do The Work by W. Kamau Bell & Kate Schatz. 

    Event DEETS: 

    When: August 17, 2022 at 7:00 PM

    Where: MATCH (3400 Main Street, HTX 77002)

    How: Limited in person seating is available. Every ticket will include a signed copy of Do the Work! 

    About the Book

    Do the Work! is a hands-on workbook for anyone overwhelmed by racial injustice, who feels shocked by all the American histories they never learned, and who keeps asking the question “what can I DOOOOOO?!” Packed with humorous, thought-provoking activities—all are rooted in history and contemporary social justice concepts—the book helps readers move from "What can I do?" to... you know... actually doing the work.

    About the Authors

    W. KAMAU BELL is a dad, husband, and comedian. He directed and executive-produced the four-part Showtime documentary We Need To Talk About Cosby, which premiered at Sundance. He famously met with the KKK on his Emmy-Award-winning CNN docu-series United Shades of America with W. Kamau Bell, where he serves as host and executive producer. He has appeared on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Conan, The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, CBS Mornings, MSNBC’s Morning Joe, Comedy Central, HBO, Fresh Air with Terry Gross, WTF with Marc Maron, The Breakfast Club, and This American Life. He has two stand-up comedy specials, Private School Negro (Netflix) and Semi-Prominent Negro (Showtime). Kamau’s writing has been featured in Time, The New York Times, Vanity Fair, The Hollywood Reporter, CNN.com, Salon, and The LA Review of Books. Kamau’s first book has an easy-to-remember title, The Awkward Thoughts of W. Kamau Bell: Tales of a 6' 4", African American, Heterosexual, Cisgender, Left-Leaning, Asthmatic, Black and Proud Blerd, Mama's Boy, Dad, and Stand-Up Comedian. He is the ACLU Artist Ambassador for Racial Justice and serves on the board of directors of Donors Choose and the advisory board of Hollaback!

     

    KATE SCHATZ is the New York Times bestselling author of Rad American Women A-Z, Rad Women Worldwide, Rad Girls Can, Rad American History A-Z, and the illustrated journal My Rad Life. She’s a writer, public speaker, educator, and left-handed vegetarian Bay Area-born-and-bred queer feminist activist mama. Kate is also a political organizer and frequent public speaker. She’s the co-founder of Solidarity Sundays, a nationwide network of over 200 feminist activist groups. She founded the organization in January 2016 with a friend and began by holding a series of monthly “activist house parties” aimed at showing women how to take meaningful, coordinated political action. After the 2016 election, the group grew from one chapter with 50 members to more than 200 chapters with 20,000+ members. As an educator, Kate has worked with a wide range of age groups for over 15 years. She taught Women’s Studies, Literature, and Creative Writing at UC Santa Cruz, San Jose State, Rhode Island College, and Brown University. And she is the former Chair of the School of Literary Arts at Oakland School for the Arts, where she taught fiction, poetry, and journalism to 9th-12th graders for many years. Kate received her MFA in Fiction from Brown University, and a double BA in Women’s Studies/Creative Writing from UC Santa Cruz. She lives with her family on the island of Alameda.
  • IRL Author Talk: Raising Anti-Racist Children with Britt Hawthorne-June 11 @1:00PM CST
    Sold out

    Please join us to celebrate the release of Raising Anti-Racist Children: A Practical Parenting Guide with Britt Hawthorne.

    EVENT DEETS

    WHEN: Saturday, June 11 @1PM CST

    WHERE: 3719 Navigation Blvd, Houston TX 77003

    HOW: Limited in person seating is available. You can grab a ticket for free or purchase a book with ticket. 

    About the Book
    Raising inclusive, antiracist children is a noble goal for any parent, caregiver, or educator, but it can be hard to know where to start. In Raising Antiracist Children, Britt Hawthorne—a nationally recognized teacher and advocate—and her coauthor Natasha Yglesias offer an interactive guide for strategically incorporating the tools of inclusivity into everyday life and parenting. Hawthorne and Yglesias break down antiracist parenting into four comprehensive sections to help adults and kids find common ground in becoming anti-biased and antiracist (ABAR) human beings -healthy bodies, radical minds, conscious shopping, thriving communities.

    Full of questionnaires, stories, practical activities, helpful tips, and tools to foster an antiracist lens, Raising Antiracist Children empowers you and your kids to become conscious citizens and active participants in working towards justice. This must-have, practical guide is essential for parents and caregivers everywhere.

    About the Author

    Britt Hawthorne (she/her) is a Black bi-racial momma, teacher, author, and anti-bias and antiracist facilitator. Together with her beloved partner, they are raising their children to become empathic, critical thinkers, embracing justice, and activism. To learn more, visit BrittHawthorne.com.

    About the Moderator

    Sachelle Reed is the morning anchor Spectrum News 1 Wisconsin. Sachelle has extensive experience, working previously as an anchor and reporter for stations in Milwaukee and Rockford. Most recently, she was an anchor / reporter for WKMG-TV in Orlando.

  • How to Raise an Antiracist

    by Ibram X. Kendi

    from $18.00

    *Ships in 7-10 Business Days*

    The book that every parent, caregiver, and teacher needs to raise the next generation of antiracist thinkers, from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of How to Be an Antiracist and recipient of the MacArthur “Genius” Grant. 

    The tragedies and reckonings around racism that are rocking the country have created a specific crisis for parents, educators, and other caregivers: How do we talk to our children about racism? How do we teach children to be antiracist? How are kids at different ages experiencing race? How are racist structures impacting children? How can we inspire our children to avoid our mistakes, to be better, to make the world better? 

    These are the questions Ibram X. Kendi found himself avoiding as he anticipated the birth of his first child. Like most parents or parents-to-be, he felt the reflex to not talk to his child about racism, which he feared would stain her innocence and steal away her joy. But research and experience changed his mind, and he realized that raising his child to be antiracist would actually protect his child, and preserve her innocence and joy. He realized that teaching students about the reality of racism and the myth of race provides a protective education in our diverse and unequal world. He realized that building antiracist societies safeguards all children from the harms of racism. 

    Following the accessible genre of his internationally bestselling How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi combines a century of scientific research with a vulnerable and compelling personal narrative of his own journey as a parent and as a child in school. The chapters follow the stages of child development from pregnancy to toddler to schoolkid to teenager. It is never too early or late to start raising young people to be antiracist.

  • Reparations and Anti-Black Racism: A Criminological Exploration of the Harms of Slavery and Racialized Injustice

    by Angus Nurse

    $34.95

    *ships in 7-10 business days

    The Black Lives Matter movement has exposed the state violence and social devaluation that Black populations continue to suffer. Police shootings and incarceration inequalities in the US and UK are just two examples of the legacy of slavery today. This book offers a criminological exploration of the case for slavery and anti-Black racism reparations in the context of the enduring harms and differential treatment of Black citizens. Through critical analysis of legal arguments and reviewing recent court actions, it refutes the policy perspectives that argue against reparations. Highlighting the human rights abuses inherent to and arising from slavery and ongoing racism, this book calls for governments to take responsibility for the impact of ongoing racialized injustice.

  • Raising Antiracist Children: A Practical Guide to Parenting

    by Britt Hawthorne and Natasha Yglesias

    $17.99

    Learn about raising inclusive, antiracist children in an informed, actionable, and accountable way with this must-have guide from antiracist and anti-biased educator and advocate Britt Hawthorne.


    Raising inclusive, antiracist children is a noble goal for any parent, caregiver, or educator, but it can be hard to know where to start. In Raising Antiracist Children, Britt Hawthorne—a nationally recognized teacher and advocate—and her coauthor Natasha Yglesias offer an interactive guide for strategically incorporating the tools of inclusivity into everyday life and parenting. Hawthorne and Yglesias break down antiracist parenting into four comprehensive sections to help adults and kids find common ground in becoming anti-biased and antiracist (ABAR) human beings:


    -Healthy bodies—Establishing a safe and body-positive home environment to combat stereotypes and create boundaries that will keep kids of all ages safe.
    -Radical minds—Encouraging children to be brave agents of change, accompanied by scripts for teaching advocacy, giving and taking productive feedback, and becoming a coconspirator for change.
    -Conscious shopping—Raising awareness of how local shopping (from food deserts to independently-owned businesses) can empower or hinder a community’s ability to thrive, and teaching readers of all ages how to create shopping habits that support their community.
    -Thriving communities—Acknowledging the personal power we have to shape our schools, towns, and worlds, accompanied by exercises for instigating change.

    Full of questionnaires, stories, practical activities, helpful tips, and tools to foster an antiracist lens, Raising Antiracist Children empowers you and your kids to become conscious citizens and active participants in working towards justice. This must-have, practical guide is essential for parents and caregivers everywhere.

  • The Antiracist Deck by Ibram X. Kendi
    $22.00

    Engage, learn, and inspire with this deck of 100 conversation starters from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of How to Be an Antiracist, Antiracist Baby, Stamped from the Beginning, and more.


    Ibram X. Kendi has raised our awareness of the importance of persistent, dedicated antiracist work. Being antiracist is an everyday commitment; in order to build a more equitable and just society, we must be diligent, making antiracist choices at every turn. Meaningful change can start at the micro-level; these conversations starters will help you along the way.

    When did you first become aware of racism? When did you first become aware of your race? Where does racism exist? What does “resistance” mean to you? Why is talking about race important? Why now?

    Whether you choose to ponder these questions alone or with family, friends, or community groups, the 100 cards in The Antiracist Deck will help you lead discussions on race, racism, antiracism, and intersectional topics like class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, power, and more.

    You have to believe you can change in order to bring it about. Start with these conversations in your home, school, church, or book club. Uncover your antiracist power within to transform your community.

  • White Tears/Brown Scars

    by Ruby Hamad

    $16.95

    Called “powerful and provocative“ by Dr. Ibram X. Kendi, author of the New York Times bestselling How to be an Antiracist, this explosive book of history and cultural criticism reveals how white feminism has been used as a weapon of white supremacy and patriarchy deployed against Black and Indigenous women, and women of color.

    Taking us from the slave era, when white women fought in court to keep “ownership” of their slaves, through the centuries of colonialism, when they offered a soft face for brutal tactics, to the modern workplace, White Tears/Brown Scars tells a charged story of white women’s active participation in campaigns of oppression. It offers a long overdue validation of the experiences of women of color.

    Discussing subjects as varied as The Hunger Games, Alexandria Ocasio–Cortez, the viral BBQ Becky video, and 19th century lynchings of Mexicans in the American Southwest, Ruby Hamad undertakes a new investigation of gender and race. She shows how the division between innocent white women and racialized, sexualized women of color was created, and why this division is crucial to confront. Along the way, there are revelatory responses to questions like: Why are white men not troubled by sexual assault on women? (See Christine Blasey Ford.) With rigor and precision, Hamad builds a powerful argument about the legacy of white superiority that we are socialized within, a reality that we must apprehend in order to fight.

  • Being You: A First Conversation About Gender

    by Megan Madison

    $8.99

    This second book in the series begins the conversation on gender, with a supportive approach that considers both the child and the adult. Stunning art accompanies the simple and interactive text, and the backmatter offers additional resources and ideas for extending this discussion.

  • Better, Not Bitter

    by Yusef Salaam

    $28.00

    *ships in 7-10 business days*

    Better Not Bitter is the first time that one of the now Exonerated Five is telling his individual story, in his own words. Yusef writes his narrative: growing up Black in central Harlem in the '80s, being raised by a strong, fierce mother and grandmother, his years of incarceration, his reentry, and exoneration. Yusef connects these stories to lessons and principles he learned that gave him the power to survive through the worst of life's experiences.

  • Democracy in Black

    by Eddie S. Glaude Jr.

    $17.00

    *ships in 7-10 business days*

    America’s great promise of equality has always rung hollow in the ears of African Americans. But today the situation has grown even more dire. Democracy in Black is Eddie S. Glaude Jr.'s impassioned response. Part manifesto, part history, part memoir, it argues that we live in a country founded on a “value gap”—with white lives valued more than others—that still distorts our politics today. 

  • Abolition for the People

    edited by Colin Kaepernick

    $27.00

    *Ships in 7-10 Business Days*

    Abolition for the People begins by uncovering the lethal anti-Black histories of policing and incarceration in the United States. Juxtaposing today’s moment with 19th-century movements for the abolition of slavery, freedom fighter Angela Y. Davis writes “Just as we hear calls today for a more humane policing, people then called for a more humane slavery.” Drawing on decades of scholarship and personal experience, each author deftly refutes the notion that police and prisons can be made fairer and more humane through piecemeal reformation. As Derecka Purnell argues, “reforms do not make the criminal legal system more just, but obscure its violence more efficiently.”

  • White Feminism

    by Koa Beck

    $17.00

    *Ships in 7-10 Business Days*

    Addressing today’s conversation about race, empowerment, and inclusion in America, Koa Beck, writer and former editor-in-chief of Jezebel, boldly examines the history of feminism, from the true mission of the suffragists to the rise of corporate feminism with clear-eyed scrutiny and meticulous detail. She also examines overlooked communities—including Native American, Muslim, transgender, and more—and their ongoing struggles for social change.

  • So You Want to Talk About Race

    by Ijeoma Oluo

    $16.99

    *ships in 7-10 business days*

    Widespread reporting on aspects of white supremacy -- from police brutality to the mass incarceration of Black Americans -- has put a media spotlight on racism in our society. Still, it is a difficult subject to talk about. How do you tell your roommate her jokes are racist? Why did your sister-in-law take umbrage when you asked to touch her hair -- and how do you make it right? How do you explain white privilege to your white, privileged friend?

  • The New Jim Crow

    by Michelle Alexander

    $18.99

    Seldom does a book have the impact of Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow. Since it was first published in 2010, it has been cited in judicial decisions and has been adopted in campus-wide and community-wide reads; it helped inspire the creation of the Marshall Project and the new $100 million Art for Justice Fund; it has been the winner of numerous prizes, including the prestigious NAACP Image Award; and it has spent nearly 250 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list.

    Most important of all, it has spawned a whole generation of criminal justice reform activists and organizations motivated by Michelle Alexander's unforgettable argument that "we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it." As the Birmingham News proclaimed, it is "undoubtedly the most important book published in this century about the U.S."

    Now, ten years after it was first published, The New Press is proud to issue a tenth-anniversary edition with a new preface by Michelle Alexander that discusses the impact the book has had and the state of the criminal justice reform movement today.

  • How to Be an Antiracist

    by Ibram X. Kendi

    from $18.99

    Ibram X. Kendi's concept of antiracism reenergizes and reshapes the conversation about racial justice in AmericaÑbut even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. In How to be an Antiracist, Kendi asks us to think about what an antiracist society might look like, and how we can play an active role in building it.

  • Our Skin: A First Conversation About Race

    by Megan Madison

    from $9.99

    *Ships in 7-10 business days*

    Developed by experts in the fields of early childhood and activism against injustice, this topic-driven board book offers clear, concrete language and beautiful imagery that young children can grasp and adults can leverage for further discussion.

    While young children are avid observers and questioners of their world, adults often shut down or postpone conversations on complicated topics because itÕs hard to know where to begin. Research shows that talking about issues like race and gender from the age of two not only helps children understand what they see, but also increases self-awareness, self-esteem, and allows them to recognize and confront things that are unfair, like discrimination and prejudice.

  • Who Will Pay Reparations on My Soul?: Essays

    by Jesse McCarthy

    $27.95

    *Ships in 7-10 Business Days*

    Ranging from Ta-Nehisi Coates’s case for reparations to Toni Morrison’s revolutionary humanism to D’Angelo’s simmering blend of R&B and racial justice, Jesse McCarthy’s bracing essays investigate with virtuosic intensity the art, music, literature, and political stances that have defined the twenty-first century. Even as our world has suffered through successive upheavals, McCarthy contends, “something was happening in the world of culture: a surging and unprecedented visibility at every level of black art making.” Who Will Pay Reparations on My Soul? reckons with this resurgence, arguing for the central role of art and intellectual culture in an age of widening inequality and moral crisis.

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