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  • America, Goddam: Violence, Black Women, and the Struggle for Justice

    by Treva B. Lindsey

    $24.95
    "Required reading for all Americans."―Kirkus Reviews
    A powerful account of violence against Black women and girls in the United States and their fight for liberation.

    Echoing the energy of Nina Simone's searing protest song that inspired the title, this book is a call to action in our collective journey toward just futures.

    America, Goddam explores the combined force of anti-Blackness, misogyny, patriarchy, and capitalism in the lives of Black women and girls in the United States today.

    Through personal accounts and hard-hitting analysis, Black feminist historian Treva B. Lindsey starkly assesses the forms and legacies of violence against Black women and girls, as well as their demands for justice for themselves and their communities. Combining history, theory, and memoir, America, Goddam renders visible the gender dynamics of anti-Black violence. Black women and girls occupy a unique status of vulnerability to harm and death, while the circumstances and traumas of this violence go underreported and understudied. America, Goddam allows readers to understand
     
    • How Black women—who have been both victims of anti-Black violence as well as frontline participants—are rarely the focus of Black freedom movements.
    • How Black women have led movements demanding justice for Breonna Taylor, Sandra Bland, Toyin Salau, Riah Milton, Aiyana Stanley-Jones, and countless other Black women and girls whose lives have been curtailed by numerous forms of violence.
    • How across generations and centuries, their refusal to remain silent about violence against them led to Black liberation through organizing and radical politics.

    America, Goddam powerfully demonstrates that the struggle for justice begins with reckoning with the pervasiveness of violence against Black women and girls in the United States
  • The Black Girl's Guide to Financial Freedom: Build Wealth, Retire Early, and Live the Life of Your Dreams

    by Paris Woods

    $24.00
    Through real-life stories coupled with clear and actionable advice, Paris Woods takes the guesswork out of wealth-building and presents a financial plan that anyone can follow.
  • Abolition Geography: Essays Towards Liberation

    by Ruth Wilson Gilmore

    $29.95

    The first collection of writings from one of the foremost contemporary critical thinkers on racism, geography and incarceration

    Abolition Geography brings together Gilmore's essays, articles and interviews from over the past two decades. One of the foremost contemporary theorists and activists in movements for prison abolition and social justice, Gilmore's essays comprise searing analyses of the origins of mass incarceration and racial violence.

    This collection reveals her to be a major theorist of the state, which she shows has today morphed into an 'anti-state state' organising the abandonment of racialised and exploited populations. Countering these new formations of power, Gilmore presents us with a powerful model for the radical articulation of scholarship and activism, and a novel way of asking ourselves the question: 'What is to be done?' Edited and introduced by Brenna Bhandar and Alberto Toscano.

  • A Time Before Crack

    by Mireille Miller-Young

    Sold out

    Once upon a time before crack, Jamel Shabazz was on the scene, working the streets of New York City, capturing the faces and places of an era that have long since disappeared.

    Once upon a time before crack, inner city communities were blighted by poverty and unemployment–but not by the drug wars that tore families apart, destroying lives with needless violence and mindless addiction. Once upon a time before crack, pride and style were as inseparable as a beatbox and mixtape, or as a pair of shoes and matching purse. Once upon a time before crack, Jamel Shabazz was on the scene, working the streets of New York City, capturing the faces and places of an era that have long since disappeared.

    Best known as Hip Hop's finest fashion photographer for his blockbuster best-selling monograph, Back in the Days (powerHouse Books, 2001), Shabazz revisited his archive and unearthed an extraordinary collection of never-before-published documentary photographs collected for his third powerHouse Books release, A Time Before Crack, a visual diary of the streets of New York City from the mid-seventies to the mid-eighties, Shabazz's distinctive photographs reveal the families, the poses, and the players who made this age extraordinary.

  • Miss Chloe: A Memoir of a Literary Friendship with Toni Morrison

    by A. J. Verdelle

    $27.99

    *ships in 7-10 business days

    The award-winning author of The Good Negress shares invaluable insights on the precarious journey toward creativity that is the writer’s life, and tells the compelling story of her relationship with Toni Morrison, painting an illuminating portrait of this towering yet enigmatic cultural icon.

    With the publication of her debut novel The Good Negress in 1995, A. J. Verdelle became an overnight sensation, winning critical acclaim and competing for prestigious literature prizes. But for Verdelle, the most unexpected consequence was the friendship she formed with the legendary Toni Morrison. Receiving an advance copy of the book, the Pulitzer and Nobel prize-winning author—notorious for never giving early praise—called The Good Negress, “Truly Extraordinary.” It was a writer’s dream come true—a dream that for Verdelle would become simultaneously exhilarating and challenging.

    Now, twenty-five years later, Verdelle tells the story of that success and what came after. Miss Chloe begins with the story of young Verdelle’s persistent aim to become an author, spending countless pre-dawn hours writing the novel that became The Good Negress. Verdelle then turns to the heady period after publication, focusing on her relationship with Toni—a precious gift that was most of the time a grace and a blessing, and at other times, confusing and too separate from literature. While Morrison continued to rise as an icon, Verdelle’s writing career took a sharp turn. Verdelle’s next novel—a Western featuring Black characters—is quickly bought by a young editor who leaves for another job before the manuscript is finished. Searching for direction, Verdelle moves to another publisher. Yet this second book will languish for more than fifteen years. In chronicling her journey, Verdelle offers an honest assessment of what it means to be a writer, including the expectations and let downs that famous friendships do not defray.

    Miss Chloe ends with the period after Morrison has passed away, when Verdelle is left to face the reality of her writing career, pondering what it means to have promise that is yet to materialize. She finds comfort in advice Morrison offered over the years, insight she shares in this wise book. “In order for Morrison to take you seriously, to have patience with you, to be interested, you had to be able to hear her,” Verdelle writes. “You had to be able to sit still and listen. You had to be able to pipe up in the pauses, and prove you understood. You needed demonstrate that language was a skill you had, that Black culture was known to you and respected by you.” 

  • Literacy Is Liberation: Working Toward Justice Through Culturally Relevant Teaching

    by Kimberly N. Parker

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    Literacy Is Liberation offers a framework for culturally relevant teaching that builds a more inclusive and equitable classroom environment and fosters high literacy achievement.
  • Black Skin: The definitive skincare guide

    by Dija Ayodele

    $29.99

    *ships/available for pickup in 7-10 business days

    The ultimate skincare guide for women of color.

    For decades, the skincare needs of Black women have been ignored.

    Until now.

    Dija Ayodele is an expert in Black skin. A pioneer in the beauty industry and one of the UK’s most-respected aestheticians, she places Black women front and center of her practice.

    In this ground-breaking book, Dija takes you through the lifetime of your skin, sharing transformative essentials from how to work out your skin type to the dos and don’ts for your everyday routine. She explains the best ingredients for your skin and your budget, to the common concerns that Black women experience from hyperpigmentation and skin discoloration to dry skin conditions and keloids. She debunks common myths and misconceptions such as do darker skin tones need sunscreen? And is there any truth to the saying ‘Black don’t crack?’

    Intelligent, informed and indispensable, Black Skin also casts a look at the concept of Blackness and identity in the beauty industry and is the definitive guide that every Black woman needs to truly understand and successfully care for her skin.

  • My America

    by Kwame Onwuachi

    $35.00

    Featuring more than 125 recipes, My America is a celebration of the food of the African Diaspora, as handed down through Onwuachi’s own family history, spanning Nigeria to the Caribbean, the South to the Bronx, and beyond. From Nigerian Jollof, Puerto Rican Red Bean Sofrito, and Trinidadian Channa (Chickpea) Curry to Jambalaya, Baby Back Ribs, and Red Velvet Cake, these are global home recipes that represent the best of the patchwork that is American cuisine.
     
    Interwoven throughout the book are stories of Onwuachi’s travels, illuminating the connections between food and place, and food and culture. The result is a deeply personal tribute to the food of “a land that belongs to you and yours and to me and mine.”

  • Rising Troublemaker: A Fear-Fighter Manual for Teens

    by Luvvie Ajayi Jones

    $17.99

    *ships in 7-10 business days*

    In this young readers edition of her New York Times bestseller Professional Troublemaker, Luvvie Ajayi Jones uses her honesty and humor to inspire teens to be their bravest, boldest, truest selves, in order to create a world they would be proud to live in.


    The world can feel like a dumpster fire, with endless things to be afraid of. It can make you feel powerless to ask for what you need, use your voice, and show up truly as your whole self. Add the fact that often, people might make you feel like your way of showing up is TOO MUCH.
     
    BE TOO MUCH, and use it for good. That is what it means to be a troublemaker. In this book, Luvvie Ajayi Jones - bestseller of books, sorceress of side-eyes and critic of culture - gives you the permission you might need to be the troublemaker you are, or wish to be. This is the book she needed when she was the kid who got in trouble for her mouth when she spoke up about what she felt was not fair. This is the book she needed when kids made fun of her Nigerian accent. This is the book that she needed when it was time to call herself a writer, but she was too scared.
     
    As a Rising Troublemaker, you need to know that the beautiful, audacious life you want is on the other side of doing the things that will scare you. This book will help you face and fight your fear and start living that life ASAP.        

  • African American Herbalism: A Practical Guide to Healing Plants and Folk Traditions

    by Lucretia Van Dyke

    $16.95

    Discover the roots of modern-day herbal remedies, plant medicine, holistic rituals, natural recipes, and more that were created by African American herbal healers throughout history.

    This first-of-its-kind herbal guide takes you through the origins of herbal practices rooted in African American tradition—from Ancient Egypt and the African tropics to the Caribbean and the United States. Inside you’ll find the stories of herbal healers like Emma Dupree and Henrietta Jeffries, who made modern American herbalism what it is today. 

    After rediscovering the forgotten legacies of these healers, African American Herbalism dives into the important contributions they made to the world of herbalism, including: 

    • Rituals for sacred bathing and skin care
    • Herbal tinctures, potions, and medicine 
    • Recipes for healing meals and soul food 
    • And more!
    You’ll also find a comprehensive herbal guide to the most commonly used herbs—such as aloe, lavender, sage, sassafras, and more—alongside gorgeous botanical illustrations. African American Herbalism is the perfect guide for anyone wanting to explore the medicinal and healing properties of herbs.
  • Alabama v. King: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Criminal Trial That Launched the Civil Rights Movement

    by David Fisher

    Sold out

    The inspiring story of the Montgomery Bus boycott trial, which brought national attention to a young Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., told by King’s lawyer and friend, Fred Gray with New York Times bestselling authors Dan Abrams and David Fisher.

     On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a segregated Montgomery, Alabama bus. After she was arrested and fined for her refusal, the African American community organized a bus boycott. Ninety-three people were jailed for breaking the city’s anti-boycott statute, but rather than trying all of them, the prosecutors chose to make an example of just one, a 27-year-old minister named Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

     Fred Gray, 24 years old and one of only two black lawyers in Montgomery, had represented Parks and now agreed to defend King in court. The stakes were huge: This was not just a trial about a city statute, this was an attempt to launch a movement in the face of an often-violent effort by a segregated Southern city to prevent them from succeeding. And it would set Gray on a path that would lead him to making an impassioned argument in front of the Supreme Court against segregation in Montgomery’s public transit.

     Filled with Gray’s personal recollections as well as King’s own vivid courtroom testimony, this book transports readers to a key moment that is often said to have sparked the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s and which introduced Martin Luther King Jr. to the world at large.

  • Bigger Than Bravery edited

    by Valerie Boyd

    $18.95

    Ships in 7-10 business days

    An anthology of Black resilience and reclamation, with contributions by Pearl Cleage, Aunjanue Ellis-Taylor, Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, Tayari Jones, Kiese Laymon, Imani Perry, Deesha Philyaw, Khadijah Queen, Jason Reynolds, Alice Walker, and more

    Born of a desire to bring together the voices of those most harshly affected by the intersecting pandemics of Covid-19 and systemic racism, Bigger Than Bravery explores comfort and compromise, challenge and resilience, throughout the Great Pause that became the Great Call. Award-winning author and scholar of the Black archive Valerie Boyd curates this anthology of original essays and poems, alongside some of the most influential nonfiction published on the subject, inviting readers into a conversation of restorative joy and enduring wisdom. 

     

  • Art on My Mind: Visual Politics

    by bell hooks

    Sold out
    “As erudite and sophisticated as hooks is, she is also eminently readable, even exhilarating.” —Booklist

    In Art on My Mind, bell hooks, a leading cultural critic, responds to the ongoing dialogues about producing, exhibiting, and criticizing art and aesthetics in an art world increasingly concerned with identity politics. Always concerned with the liberatory black struggle, hooks positions her writings on visual politics within the ever-present question of how art can be an empowering and revolutionary force within the black community.
  • We Want for Our Sisters What We Want for Ourselves: African American Women Who Practice Polygyny/Polygamy by Consent (2ND ed.) by Patricia Dixon
    $12.95

    In We Want for Our Sisters What We Want for Ourselves, Dr. Patricia Dixon (aka Ra Heter) debunks myths about monogamy and polygyny and challenges us to rethink our approach to marriage and family. This book reveals that before European domination, polygyny was an accepted marriage and family practice in over eighty percent of the world's cultures. Even in Western societies, polygyny has always been practiced. However, because it is done under a myth of monogamy, this creates a "peculiar" form of the practice. This peculiar form of polygyny was practiced in early European history in Greece and Rome. It was also practiced during slavery in the U.S. to the detriment of African American women and their families. Even in contemporary America, because closed polygyny is practiced in various forms, under the guise of monogamy, it continues to disempower African American women and undermine their marriages and families.

    Dr. Dixon offers many reasons to support polygyny, most importantly, the shortage of available African American men. Through extensive interviews, she offers an insider's look at polygynous marriages, showing readers its benefits and disadvantages, interpersonal dynamics, how financial, sexual, and parental responsibilities are determined, and the legal, moral and cultural challenges that must be overcome in order to make polygynous marriages possible within American society. Finally, she calls for African American women to move toward building marriages based on love, truth, community, and ultimately a womanist ethic of care for sisters.

  • Golden Gulag

    by Ruth Wilson Gilmore

    $28.95
    "A magnificent analysis of the political economy of superincarceration and the slave plantations that California calls prisons."--Mike Davis, author of "Ecology of Fear"
    ""Golden Gulag" is a deeply necessary book for our times. Gilmore digs beneath the easy answers to the more troubling causes of a political consensus that prisons are the only solution to all urban and rural ills."--Nayan Shah, author of "Contagious Divides: Epidemics and Race in San Francisco's Chinatown"
    "Ruth Gilmore lays bare the diabolical logic of neoliberal incarceration. She shows us that the prison is a symptom of the decline of our civilization, how the California Nightmare has produced its disposable population. Gilmore's depressingly hopeful analysis is a wake-up call for our somnolence."--Vijay Prashad, author of "Keeping Up with the Dow Joneses: Debt, Prison, Workfare"
  • My Seven Black Fathers: A Young Activist's Memoir of Race, Family, and the Mentors Who Made Him Whole

    by Will Jawando

    $28.00

    *ships in 7-10 business days

    A call to action and a narrative that runs counter to every racist stereotype that thwarts the lives of men of color today.

    Will Jawando tells a deeply affirmative story of hope and respect for men of color at a time when Black men are routinely stigmatized. As a boy growing up outside DC, Will, who went by his Nigerian name, Yemi, was shunted from school to school, never quite fitting in. He was a Black kid with a divorced white mother, a frayed relationship with his biological father, and teachers who scolded him for being disruptive in class and on the playground. Eventually, he became close to Kalfani, a kid he looked up to on the basketball court. Years after he got the call telling him that Kalfani was dead, another sickening casualty of gun violence, Will looks back on the relationships with an extraordinary series of mentors that enabled him to thrive.

    Among them were Mr. Williams, the rare Black male grade school teacher, who found a way to bolster Will’s self-esteem when he discovered he was being bullied; Jay Fletcher, the openly gay colleague of his mother who got him off junk food and took him to his first play; Mr. Holmes, the high school coach and chorus director who saw him through a crushing disappointment; Deen Sanwoola, the businessman who helped him bridge the gap between his American upbringing and his Nigerian heritage, eventually leading to a dramatic reconciliation with his biological father; and President Barack Obama, who made Will his associate director of public engagement at the White House—and who invited him to play basketball on more than one occasion. Without the influence of these men, Will knows he would not be who he is today: a civil rights and education policy attorney, a civic leader, a husband, and a father.

    Drawing on Will’s inspiring personal story and involvement in My Brother’s Keeper, President Obama’s national initiative to address persistent opportunity gaps facing boys and young men of color, My Seven Black Fathers offers a transformative way for Black men to shape the next generation.

  • Game: An Autobiography

    by Grant Hill

    $30.00

    The full, frank story of a remarkable life’s journey—to the pinnacle of success as a basketball player, icon, and entrepreneur, to the depths of personal trauma and back, to a place of flourishing and peace—made possible above all by a family’s love


    Grant Hill always had game. His choice of college was a subject of national interest, and his arrival at Duke University cemented the program’s arrival at the top. In his freshman year, he led the team to its first NCAA championship, and three championship appearances in four years. His Duke career produced some of the most iconic moments in college basketball history, and Coach K proved to be a lifelong mentor. Later, as one of the NBA’s best players and a new face of the Detroit Pistons franchise, Hill was the first person with the potential to give Michael Jordan a run for his money, not just as a player but as a brand. His $45 million rookie contract was almost the least of it. He turned down Nike for Fila, and soon Method Man and Tupac Shakur were wearing his shoes.
     
    Hill writes candidly about all of it, including the transactional impermanence of life in the league and the isolation caused by his growing fame. His parents and friends helped ground him, and eventually he met a gifted musician named Tamia. The love he found with her and the arrival of their two beautiful daughters would be his rock as a brutal and mysterious injury sidelined him, coinciding with his wife’s own serious health struggles.
     
    With openness and insight, Hill relates his entire path, including post-career highlights like his Hall of Fame induction, co-ownership of the Atlanta Hawks, the directorship of the USA Basketball Men’s National Team, and even a yearly gig calling the Final Four. Hill’s father, Calvin, used to tell him that there were always a lot of reasons but never any excuses, and Game is a distillation of a lifetime’s effort to understand the reasons—the good and the bad. At his hardest moments, Hill sought out wisdom from others, stories of inspiration and overcoming obstacles. Now, with Game, he has returned the favor.

  • We Refuse to Forget: A True Story of Black Creeks, American Identity, and Power by Caleb Gayle
    $18.00

    *Ships in 7-10 business days*

    A landmark work of Black and Native American history that reconfigures our understanding of identity, race, and belonging and the inspiring ways marginalized people have pushed to redefine their world.

    In this paradigm-shattering work of American history, Caleb Gayle tells the extraordinary story of the Creek Nation, a Native tribe that two centuries ago both owned slaves and accepted Black people as full members. Thanks to the leadership of a chief named Cow Tom—a former Black slave—a treaty with the U.S. government recognized Creek citizenship for its Black members. Yet this equality was shredded in the 1970s when Creek leadership canceled citizenship to Black Creeks, even those who can trace their tribal history back generations. 
     
    Why did this happen? What led to this reversal? How was the U.S. government involved? And how can marginalized people today defend themselves? These are some of the questions that award-winning journalist Caleb Gayle explores in this provocative examination of racial and ethnic identity. By delving deep into the historical record and interviewing Black Creeks suing the Creek Nation to have their citizenship reinstated, he lays bare the racism, ambition, and greed at the heart of this story. The result is an eye-opening account that challenges our preconceptions of identity as it shines new light on the long shadows of marginalization and white supremacy that continue to hamper progress for Black Americans.

  • Teaching with Equity: Strategies and Resources for Building a Culturally Responsive and Race-Conscious Classroom by Aja Hannah
    $15.95

    Learn how to incorporate equitable teaching practices in your everyday classroom with this helpful guide designed to help your young students thrive.

    Bringing racial equity into the classroom doesn’t have to be an intimidating task. Teaching with Equity will help you take the first step in making your classroom a fun, safe, and fulfilling environment for all students.

    First, start off by establishing a baseline: Where is racial equity lacking in your classroom and where are there opportunities for change? Then learn about the common stereotypes that students of color often face before finally diving into resources like interactive worksheets, surveys, grading rubrics, lesson plans, and more designed to help teachers:

    • Talk about race effectively with your young students
    • Include diverse people and cultures in assignments and homework
    • Provide learning resources and material that feature people of color
    • Build racial comfort in your classroom
    • And more!
    Teaching with Equity will help K–5 school teachers gain the confidence and knowledge needed to make their classroom equitable for students of all backgrounds.
  • Black Life Matter: Blackness, Religion, and the Subject

    by Biko Mandela Gray

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    In Black Life Matter, Biko Mandela Gray offers a philosophical eulogy for Aiyana Stanley-Jones, Tamir Rice, Alton Sterling, and Sandra Bland that attests to their irreducible significance in the face of unremitting police brutality. Gray employs a theoretical method he calls “sitting with”—a philosophical practice of care that seeks to defend the dead and the living. He shows that the police that killed Stanley-Jones and Rice reduced them to their bodies in ways that turn black lives into tools that the state uses to justify its violence and existence. He outlines how Bland’s arrest and death reveal the affective resonances of blackness, and he contends that Sterling’s physical movement and speech before he was killed point to black flesh as unruly living matter that exceeds the constraints of the black body. These four black lives, Gray demonstrates, were more than the brutal violence enacted against them; they speak to a mode of life that cannot be fully captured by the brutal logics of antiblackness.

    Review

    "Black Life Matter is a powerful and moving book, a challenge and a rejoinder to white western philosophy, a deep thinking from black and flesh. This book becomes more urgent and more necessary with each passing day." -- Christina Sharpe, author of ― In the Wake: On Blackness and Being

    "Over the last three decades, there has been a kind of unspoken rift between black religion and black studies. In this powerful book, Biko Mandela Gray strongly contributes to bridging that gap, exemplifying recent interest in Black Lives Matter and black religion. 
    Black Life Matter is timely and thought provoking." -- Joseph R. Winters, author of ― Hope Draped in Black: Race, Melancholy, and the Agony of Progress

     

    About the Author

    Biko Mandela Gray is Assistant Professor of Religion at Syracuse University and coeditor of The Religion of White Rage: White Workers, Religious Fervor, and the Myth of Black Racial Progress.
  • Lessons in Liberation: An Abolitionist Toolkit for Educators

    by The Education for Liberation Network & Critical Resistance Editorial Collective

    $25.00

    A political vision for a future ripe with alternatives to imprisonment and punishment.

    Born from sustained organizing, and rooted in Black and women of color feminisms, disability justice, and other movements, abolition calls for an end to our reliance on imprisonment, policing and surveillance, and to imagine a safer future for our communities.

    Lessons in Liberation: An Abolitionist Toolkit for Educators offers entry points to build critical and intentional bridges between educational practice and the growing movement for abolition. Designed for educators, parents, and young people, this toolkit shines a light on innovative abolitionist projects, particularly in pre-K–12 learning contexts.

    Sections are dedicated to entry points into Prison Industrial Complex abolition and education; the application of the lessons and principles of abolition; and stories about growing abolition outside of school settings. Topics addressed throughout include student organizing, immigrant justice in the face of ICE, approaches to sex education, arts-based curriculum, and building abolitionist skills and thinking in lesson plans.

    The result of patient and urgent work, and more than five years in the making, Lessons in Liberation invites educators into the work of abolition.

    Contributors include Black Organizing Project, Chicago Women’s Health Center, Mariame Kaba and Project NIA, Bettina L. Love, the MILPA Collective, and artists from the Justseeds Collective, among others.

  • Don't Let It Get You Down: Essays on Race, Gender, and the Body

    by Savala Nolan

    $17.99

    A “brutal, beautifully rendered” (The New York Times Book Review) collection of essays that offers poignant reflections on living between society’s most charged, politicized, and intractable polar spaces—between black and white, rich and poor, thin and fat.

    Savala Nolan knows what it means to live in the in-between. Descended from a Black and Mexican father and a white mother, Nolan’s mixed-race identity is obvious, for better and worse. At her mother’s encouragement, she began her first diet at the age of three and has been both fat and painfully thin throughout her life. She has experienced both the discomfort of generational poverty and the ease of wealth and privilege.

    It is these liminal spaces—of race, class, and body type—that the essays in Don’t Let It Get You Down excavate, presenting a clear and nuanced understanding of our society’s most intractable points of tension. The twelve essays that comprise this collection are rich with “gorgeous prose” (Nadia Owusu, author of Aftershocks) and are as humorous and as full of Nolan’s appetites as they are of anxiety. The result is lyrical and magnetic.

    In “On Dating White Guys While Me,” Nolan realizes her early romantic pursuits of rich, preppy white guys weren’t about preference but about self-erasure. In the titular essay “Don’t Let it Get You Down,” we traverse the cyclical richness and sorrow of being Black in America as Black children face police brutality, “large Black females” encounter unique stigma, and Black men carry the weight of other people’s fear. In “Bad Education,” we see how women learn to internalize rage and accept violence to participate in our own culture. And in “To Wit and Also,” we meet Filliss, Grace, and Peggy, the enslaved women owned by Nolan’s white ancestors, reckoning with the knowledge that America’s original sin lives intimately within our present stories. Over and over again, Nolan reminds us that our true identities are often most authentically lived not in the black and white, but in the grey of the in-between.

    Perfect for fans of Heavy by Kiese Laymon and Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay, Don’t Let It Get You Down delivers a “deeply personal insight” (Layla F. Saad, New York Times bestselling author of Me and White Supremacy) on race, class, bodies, and gender in America today.

  • Sex and the Single Woman: 24 Writers Reimagine Helen Gurley Brown's Cult Classic

    edited by Eliza M. Smith & Haley Swanson

    $16.99

    This fresh, voice-driven feminist anthology reimagines Helen Gurley Brown’s seminal work Sex and the Single Girl in time for its 60th anniversary, featuring twenty-four essays from acclaimed and bestselling authors, including Kristen Arnett, Morgan Parker, Evette Dionne, and Melissa Febos.

    In May 1962, Helen Gurley Brown's Sex and the Single Girl sent shockwaves through the United States, selling more than two million copies in three weeks. The future Cosmopolitan Editor-in-Chief’s book promoted the message that a woman’s needs, ambition, and success during her single years could actually take precedence over the search for a husband.  

    While much of Brown’s advice is outdated and even offensive by today’s standards, her central message remains relevant. In this exceptional anthology, Eliza Smith and Haley Swanson bring together insights from many of today’s leading feminist thinkers and writers to pay homage to Brown’s original work and reinterpret it for a new generation. These contributors provide a much-needed reckoning while addressing today’s central issues, from contraception and abortion (topics the publisher banned from the original) to queer and trans womanhood, racial double standards, dating with disabilities, sexual consent, singlehood by choice, single parenting, and more. 

    Written for today’s women, this revisionist anthology honors Brown’s irreverent spirit just as it celebrates and validates women’s sexual lives and individual eras of singlehood, encouraging us all to reclaim joy where it’s so often been denied.

  • Flyboy 2: The Greg Tate Reader

    by Greg Tate

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    Flyboy 2 provides a panoramic view of the last thirty years of Greg Tate's influential cultural criticism of contemporary Black music, art, literature, film, and politics. These essays, interviews, and reviews cover everything from Miles Davis, Ice Cube, and Suzan Lori Parks to Afro-futurism, Kara Walker, and Amiri Baraka.


    Since launching his career at the Village Voice in the early 1980s Greg Tate has been one of the premiere critical voices on contemporary Black music, art, literature, film, and politics. Flyboy 2 provides a panoramic view of the past thirty years of Tate's influential work. Whether interviewing Miles Davis or Ice Cube, reviewing an Azealia Banks mixtape or Suzan-Lori Parks's Topdog/Underdog, discussing visual artist Kara Walker or writer Clarence Major, or analyzing the ties between Afro-futurism, Black feminism, and social movements, Tate's resounding critical insights illustrate how race, gender, and class become manifest in American popular culture. Above all, Tate demonstrates through his signature mix of vernacular poetics and cultural theory and criticism why visionary Black artists, intellectuals, aesthetics, philosophies, and politics matter to twenty-first-century America. 
     
  • Post Black: How a New Generation Is Redefining African American Identity

    by Ytasha L. Womack

    $16.95
    As a young journalist covering black life at large, author Ytasha L. Womack was caught unaware when she found herself straddling black culture’s rarely acknowledged generation gaps and cultural divides. Traditional images show blacks unified culturally, politically, and socially, united by race at venues such as churches and community meetings. But in the “post black” era, even though individuals define themselves first as black, they do not necessarily define themselves by tradition as much as by personal interests, points of view, and lifestyle.
     
    In Post Black: How a New Generation Is Redefining African American Identity, Womack takes a fresh look at dynamics shaping the lives of contemporary African Americans. Although grateful to generations that have paved the way, many cannot relate to the rhetoric of pundits who speak as ambassadors of black life any more than they see themselves in exaggerated hip-hop images. Combining interviews, opinions of experts, and extensive research, Post Black will open the eyes of some, validate the lives of others, and provide a realistic picture of the expanding community.
  • Katie's Canon: Womanism and the Soul of the Black Community, Revised and Expanded 25th Anniversary Edition

    by Katie Geneva Cannon

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    *ships in 7-10 business days

    The 25th Anniversary Edition of the Classic Text

     Katie's Canon is a selection of essays written for a variety of occasions throughout Cannon's celebrated career. This new edition contains three additional essays and a new foreword by Emilie Townes. The volume weaves together the particularities of Cannon's own history and the oral tradition of African American women, African American women's literary traditions, and sociocultural and ethical analysis. The result is a classic. Cannon addresses racism and economics, analyses of Zora Neale Hurston as a resource for a constructive ethic, the importance of race and gender in the development of a Black liberation ethic, womanist preaching in the Black church, and slave ideology and biblical interpretation.

  • Freedom Farmers: Agricultural Resistance and the Black Freedom Movement

    by Monica M. White

    $19.95

    *Ships in 7-10 Business Days*

    In May 1967, internationally renowned activist Fannie Lou Hamer purchased forty acres of land in the Mississippi Delta, launching the Freedom Farms Cooperative (FFC). A community-based rural and economic development project, FFC would grow to over 600 acres, offering a means for local sharecroppers, tenant farmers, and domestic workers to pursue community wellness, self-reliance, and political resistance. Life on the cooperative farm presented an alternative to the second wave of northern migration by African Americans--an opportunity to stay in the South, live off the land, and create a healthy community based upon building an alternative food system as a cooperative and collective effort.

    Freedom Farmers expands the historical narrative of the black freedom struggle to embrace the work, roles, and contributions of southern Black farmers and the organizations they formed. Whereas existing scholarship generally views agriculture as a site of oppression and exploitation of black people, this book reveals agriculture as a site of resistance and provides a historical foundation that adds meaning and context to current conversations around the resurgence of food justice/sovereignty movements in urban spaces like Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee, New York City, and New Orleans.

  • Florynce "Flo" Kennedy: The Life of a Black Feminist Radical

    by Sherie M. Randolph

    $27.95
    The first complete biography of the brilliant and ostentatious Black Power and women’s liberation leader

    Often photographed in a cowboy hat with her middle finger held defiantly in the air, Florynce "Flo" Kennedy (1916–2000) left a vibrant legacy as a leader of the Black Power and feminist movements. In the first biography of Kennedy, Sherie M. Randolph traces the life and political influence of this strikingly bold and controversial radical activist. Rather than simply reacting to the predominantly white feminist movement, Kennedy brought the lessons of Black Power to white feminism and built bridges in the struggles against racism and sexism. Randolph narrates Kennedy's progressive upbringing, her pathbreaking graduation from Columbia Law School, and her long career as a media-savvy activist, showing how Kennedy rose to founding roles in organizations such as the National Black Feminist Organization and the National Organization for Women, allying herself with both white and black activists such as Adam Clayton Powell, H. Rap Brown, Betty Friedan, and Shirley Chisholm.

    Making use of an extensive and previously uncollected archive, Randolph demonstrates profound connections within the histories of the new left, civil rights, Black Power, and feminism, showing that black feminism was pivotal in shaping postwar U.S. liberation movements.
  • Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors

    by Carolyn Finney

    $27.95
    Why are African Americans so underrepresented when it comes to interest in nature, outdoor recreation, and environmentalism? In this thought-provoking study, Carolyn Finney looks beyond the discourse of the environmental justice movement to examine how the natural environment has been understood, commodified, and represented by both white and black Americans. Bridging the fields of environmental history, cultural studies, critical race studies, and geography, Finney argues that the legacies of slavery, Jim Crow, and racial violence have shaped cultural understandings of the "great outdoors" and determined who should and can have access to natural spaces.
    Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors

    Why are African Americans so underrepresented when it comes to interest in nature, outdoor recreation, and environmentalism? In this thought-provoking study, Carolyn Finney looks beyond the discourse of the environmental justice movement to examine how the natural environment has been understood, commodified, and represented by both white and black Americans. Bridging the fields of environmental history, cultural studies, critical race studies, and geography, Finney argues that the legacies of slavery, Jim Crow, and racial violence have shaped cultural understandings of the "great outdoors" and determined who should and can have access to natural spaces.

    Drawing on a variety of sources from film, literature, and popular culture, and analyzing different historical moments, including the establishment of the Wilderness Act in 1964 and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Finney reveals the perceived and real ways in which nature and the environment are racialized in America. Looking toward the future, she also highlights the work of African Americans who are opening doors to greater participation in environmental and conservation concerns.
  • Art as Social Action: An Introduction to the Principles and Practices of Teaching Social Practice Art

    by Gregory Sholette, Chloë Bass. & Social Practice Queens

    $24.99

    "Art as Social Action . . . is an essential guide to deepening social art practices and teaching them to students." —Laura Raicovich, president and executive director, Queens Museum

    Art as Social Action is both a general introduction to and an illustrated, practical textbook for the field of social practice, an art medium that has been gaining popularity in the public sphere. With content arranged thematically around such topics as direct action, alternative organizing, urban imaginaries, anti-bias work, and collective learning, among others, Art as Social Action is a comprehensive manual for teachers about how to teach art as social practice.

    Along with a series of introductions by leading social practice artists in the field, valuable lesson plans offer examples of pedagogical projects for instructors at both college and high school levels with contributions written by prominent social practice artists, teachers, and thinkers, including:

    • Mary Jane Jacob
    • Maureen Connor
    • Brian Rosa
    • Pablo Helguera
    • Jen de los Reyes
    • Jeanne van Heeswick
    • Jaishri Abichandani
    • Loraine Leeson
    • Ala Plastica
    • Daniel Tucker
    • Fiona Whelan
    • Bo Zheng
    • Dipti Desai
    • Noah Fischer


    Lesson plans also reflect the ongoing pedagogical and art action work of Social Practice Queens (SPQ), a unique partnership between Queens College CUNY and the Queens Museum.

  • Facsimile Cabinet of Women Origin Stories: Reflections

    by Theaster Gates

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    *Ships in 7-10 Business Days*

    A multidisciplinary look at the foremost archive of Black American visual culture, as recast by Theaster Gates

    This book features essays and other reflections commissioned in response to the Facsimile Cabinet of Women Origin Stories, a monumental participatory work by Theaster Gates (born 1973). The Cabinet includes nearly 3,000 framed images of women from the Johnson Publishing Company archive, and highlights from the collection appear in this edited volume.
    Founded in 1942, Chicago-based Johnson Publishing chronicled the lives of Black Americans for more than seven decades through the magazines Ebony and Jet. Composed from arguably the most important archive of American Black visual culture in the 20th century, Gates’ work centers the essential and too often unsung role of women in this history.
    When the Cabinet was exhibited at the Colby College Museum of Art, 12 women from a wide range of disciplines (including archivists, legal scholars, anthropologists and librarians, as well as curators, visual artists, filmmakers, writers and art historians) were invited to reflect on a work that brings a sisterhood of images to light.

  • You Can Have a Better Period: A Practical Guide to Pain-free and Calmer Periods

    by Le'Nise Brothers

    $18.95
    A practical guide to understanding your cycle and balancing your hormones with nutrition and yoga, for a calm and pain-free period. Written by Le’Nise Brothers, a nutritional therapist, yoga teacher and popular women’s health, hormone and wellbeing coach. 

    You Can Have A Better Period is a straight-talking resource to help women understand their  menstrual cycles and finally get answers to questions such as: “why am I so moody right before my period?”, “are periods supposed to be so painful?”, “why is my period so heavy?”, “is it normal to get headaches right before my period?”

    Le'Nise Brothers takes us through each phase of our cycle, including a clear programme of nutrition and lifestyle changes. The book explains which supplements work and the key stress management habits we can implement, to bring long-lasting and sustainable changes to our hormonal balance and menstrual health. 
     
    In Western society, we have accepted a cultural narrative that periods are supposed to be painful, emotional and messy. This book will be a practical guide that helps women change the way they look at their period, and finally harness the power of the fifth vital sign. 

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