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  • To the Realization of Perfect Helplessness by Robin Coste Lewis
    $35.00
    A genre-bending exploration of poetry, photography, and human migration—another revelatory visual expedition from the National Book Award–winning poet who changed the way we see art, the museum, and the Black female figure. • Winner of the PEN/Voelcker Award for Poetry

    “Lewis pushes the limits of language and image, composing lines alongside a cache of hundreds of photographs found under her late grandmother’s bed only days before the house was slated to be razed.” —Kevin Young, The New Yorker

    Twenty-five years ago, after her maternal grandmother’s death, Robin Coste Lewis discovered a stunning collection of photographs in an old suitcase under her bed, filled with everything from sepia tintypes to Technicolor Polaroids. Lewis’s family had survived one of the largest migrations in human history, when six million Americans fled the South, attempting to escape from white supremacy and white terrorism. But these photographs of daily twentieth-century Black life revealed a concealed, interior history. The poetry Lewis joins to these vivid images stands forth as an inspiring alternative to the usual ways we frame the old stories of “race” and “migration,” placing them within a much vaster span of time and history.

    In what she calls “a film for the hands” and “an origin myth for the future,” Lewis reverses our expectations of both poetry and photography: “Black pages, black space, black time––the Big Black Bang.” From glamorous outings to graduations, birth announcements, baseball leagues, and back-porch delight, Lewis creates a lyrical documentary about Black intimacy. Instead of colonial nostalgia, she offers us “an exalted Black privacy.” What emerges is a dynamic reframing of what it means to be human and alive, with Blackness at its center. “I am trying / to make the gods / happy,” she writes amid these portraits of her ancestors. “I am trying to make the dead / clap and shout.”
  • Iconic Home: Interiors, Advice, and Stories from 50 Amazing Black Designers

    by June Reese

    $50.00

    Black Interior Designers, Inc. (BID) presents the extraordinary work of 50 interior designers and offers a behind-the-scenes look as they share their inspirations, expertise, and thoughts on what it means to be a designer of color working in the industry today.

    In 2010, Black Interior Designers, Inc. (BID) began to unite, connect, and promote Black designers, bringing their projects into the spotlight.

    In Iconic Home: Interiors, Advice, and Stories from 50 Amazing Black Designers, author Ashley June Reese lends her thoughtful eye and powerful writing, weaving together inspiring interiors and the fascinating personal stories of each featured designer. Featuring 50 industry stars, with notable names such as Justina Blakeney, Faith Blakeney, Adair Curtis and Jason Bolden of JSN Studio, Bridgid Coulter, Corey Damen Jenkins, Forbes & Masters, General Judd, Keia McSwain, Brigette Romanek, the book tells their stories and shares their challenges and triumphs. Design philosophies and creative influences are brought to light and are illuminated with wonderfully designed spaces in a range of styles. The result is a behind-the-scenes look at what it means to be a designer of color creating work in the industry today.

  • Growing at Greenfields

    by Diana Yates

    $32.99

    Diana Yates shares her guide to creating a flower and veg garden from scratch, and how it turned out to be larder, source of home decoration and a place of restoration and healing, too. From planting for pollinators to growing a pumpkin patch and storing your homegrown produce, Diana takes us through the growing year at her home, Greenfields.

    Growing at Greenfields follows a year with Diana Yates in her garden in the picturesque Scottish Borders. She shows that anyone can raise their own veg, create a plant theatre, cook seasonally and decorate their home using home-grown dried or fresh flowers. You don’t need a grand house or huge plot, by the way—her veg are all grown in a raised bed, her potatoes are in sacks, and her plant theatre created using pots.

    Guided by the seasons, there are helpful checklists of essential garden tasks, advice on seeds and cuttings, how to store your precious produce, planting for wildlife and more. Also included are projects for indoors and out, such as making a potager, crafting an autumn wreath, growing peas in guttering and making your own calendula balm. Diana also shares her favorite garden-to-table family recipes so you can show off your produce, from Garlic Scape Pesto to Comforting Cauliflower Soup. By growing, crafting and cooking, make a place that you can truly call home.

  • Charles White: A Little Higher

    by Lowe Art Museum

    $35.00

    *ships in 7-10 business days

    Charles White: A Little Higher explores the work and life of noted twentieth-century black artist Charles White (1918–79). 

    An influential painter, printmaker, and teacher, Charles White’s work is primarily figurative and concerned with the challenges and triumphs of Black life in America. He created “images of dignity” that ennobled his subjects while acknowledging the realities of systemic racism and oppression. This volume brings together a biographical overview of White’s life, three thoughtful essays about White’s work by noted scholars, an in-depth interview about White with contemporary Black artist Bing Davis, and full-page images accompanied by descriptions of approximately forty works by White. The book is a companion to the exhibition of the same name, which will be on view at the University of Miami’s Lowe Art Museum and will travel to Hickory Museum of Art (Hickory, NC) and the Cincinnati Art Museum. 

  • Queen Bey: A Celebration of the Power and Creativity of Beyoncé Knowles-Carter

    by Veronica Chambers

    Sold out
    From the editor of the bestselling anthology The Meaning of Michelle, a celebration of one of the greatest stars of our time
    Beyoncé. Her name conjures more than music, it has come to be synonymous with beauty, glamour, power, creativity, love, and romance. Her performances are legendary, her album releases events. She is not even forty but she has already rewritten the Beyoncé playbook more than half a dozen times. She is consistently provocative, political and surprising. As a solo artist, she has sold more than 100 million records. She has won 22 Grammys and is the most nominated women in the award’s history. Her 2018 performance at Coachella wowed the world. The New York Times wrote: "There's not likely to be a more meaningful, absorbing, forceful and radical performance by an American musician this year or any year soon." Artist, business woman, mother, daughter, sister, wife, black feminist, Queen Bey is endlessly fascinating.


    Queen Bey features a diverse range of voices, from star academics to outspoken cultural critics to Hollywood and music stars.

  • Ming Smith: An Aperture Monograph
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    Ming Smith’s poetic and experimental images are icons of twentieth-century African American life.

    One of the greatest artist-photographers working today, Smith moved to New York in the 1970s and began to make images charged with startling beauty and spiritual energy. This long-awaited monograph brings together four decades of Smith’s work, celebrating her trademark lyricism, distinctively blurred silhouettes, dynamic street scenes, and deep devotion to theater, music, poetry, and dance—from the “Pittsburgh Cycle” plays of August Wilson to the Afrofuturism of Sun Ra. With never-before-seen images, and a range of illuminating essays and interviews, this tribute to Smith’s singular vision promises to be an enduring contribution to the history of American photography.

    Copublished by Aperture and Documentary Arts
  • Lorna Simpson Collages
    $29.95
    "Black women's heads of hair are galaxies unto themselves, solar systems, moonscapes, volcanic interiors."
    —Elizabeth Alexander, from the Introduction

    Using advertising photographs of black women (and men) drawn from vintage issues of Ebony and Jet magazines, the exquisite and thought-provoking collages of world-renowned artist Lorna Simpson explore the richly nuanced language of hair. Surreal coiffures made from colorful ink washes, striking geological formations from old textbooks, and other unexpected forms and objects adorn the models to mesmerizingly beautiful effect.

    Featuring 160 artworks, an artist's statement, and an introduction by poet, author, and scholar Elizabeth Alexander, this volume celebrates the irresistible power of Simpson's visual vernacular.
  • Wangechi Mutu edited by Margot Norton
    $69.95

    Wangechi Mutu's multidisciplinary practice grapples with contemporary realities while proffering new models for a radically changed future informed by feminism, Afrofuturism, and interspecies symbiosis. Her work addresses some of today's most critical questions concerning historical violence and its impact on women, together with our inextricable ties toward one another, our ecosystems, and other life forms.

    Accompanying a major solo exhibition at the New Museum opening in February 2023, this expansive survey will trace the entirety of Mutu's influential career chronologically, from early sculptural works of the late 1990s to her collage works of the early 2000s and more recent video works, large-scale sculptures, and site-specific interventions.

    This monograph provides the opportunity to see thematic through-lines and progressions across the entire arc of Mutu's career to date. Her sculptures inaugurated the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Façade Project, and her work is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Tate Modern, London, among other major institutions.

  • Living Wild

    by Hilton Carter

    $45.00

    In Living Wild, bestselling “plantfluencer”, author, designer and family man Hilton Carter explores multiple ways to style your home with plants—and cultivate happiness along the way.

    The therapeutic benefits of living with and tending plants are well known—they offer a connection to the natural world that nurtures our mental and physical health. In Living Wild, Hilton Carter shows how to create a lush, stylish space with flourishing plants that bring life to your home and happiness to your life. He discusses interior design choices—choosing the right color scheme, textures, and materials to showcase gorgeous greenery—then takes a deep dive into styling. From picking the perfect planter to statement plants and taking in centerpieces, living art and hanging planters plus outdoors spaces and plants for kids along the way, Living Wild is packed with interior design and styling ideas that blur the boundary beside inside and out. Finally, we visit 8 unique homes that have been plant styled by Hilton and take a detailed look at his top ten designer plants, along with care and info tips.

  • Adrienne Raquel: ONYX

    by Adrienne Raquel

    $55.00

    In ONYX, photographer Adrienne Raquel explores the intensity and escapism of the strip club experience, documenting performers at Houston’s famed Club Onyx. Raquel’s photography is usually editorial, with high-powered celebrities such as Megan Thee Stallion, Lil Nas X and Travis Scott as subjects. Now, for this project commissioned by Fotografiska New York, she turns her lens toward a community of underrepresented artists in her hometown. At Club Onyx, strippers display their bodies and seductiveness, but there’s a virtue to this particular space: “they don’t get naked” is a common description of the club’s ambiance. Performers there negotiate what “stripper” means to them on their own terms.


    Raquel captures these performers with her signature glossy style. From powerful images of the dancers mid-movement to detailed shots and intimate portraits, Raquel’s photographs place their beauty and energy on full display. She also takes viewers behind the scenes, giving us a window into the community the dancers have built in the privacy of the locker room. ONYX displays the empowerment and inclusivity in strip clubs that society has tended to ignore.


    Adrienne Raquel (born 1990) is a Texas-raised photographer and art director working between Houston, New York and Los Angeles. Featured in Aperture's New Black Vanguard, she received her first solo exhibition at Fotografiska New York in 2021. Clients include Apple, Savage x Fenty, Pat McGrath Labs, Dior, Bacardi, Rare Beauty, Bacardi, Nike and Beats By Dre, as well as covers for Vanity Fair, V Magazine, GQ and Interview.


  • Souls Grown Deep like the Rivers: Black Artists from the American South
    $35.00

    A wide-ranging survey of Black art in the American South, from Thornton Dial and Nellie Mae Rowe to the quilters of Gee’s Bend

    For generations, Black artists from the American South have forged a unique art tradition. Working in near isolation from established practices, they have created masterpieces in clay, driftwood, roots, soil, and recycled and cast-off objects that articulate America’s painful past—the inhuman practice of enslavement, the cruel segregationist policies of the Jim Crow era and institutionalized racism. Their works respond to issues ranging from economic inequality, oppression and social marginalization to sexuality, the influence of place and ancestral memory.
    Among the sculptures, paintings, reliefs and drawings included here—the majority from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation in Atlanta—are works by Thornton Dial, Lonnie Holley, Ronald Lockett, Hawkins Bolden, Bessie Harvey, Charles Williams, Mary T. Smith, Purvis Young, Mose Tolliver, Nellie Mae Rowe, Mary Lee Bendolph, Marlene Bennett Jones, Martha Jane Pettway, Loretta Pettway and Henry and Georgia Speller. Also featured are the celebrated quiltmakers of Gee’s Bend, Alabama, and work from the neighboring communities of Rehoboth and Alberta.

  • Simone Leigh
    $75.00

    Over the past two decades, Simone Leigh has created artwork that situates questions of Black femme-identified subjectivity at the center of contemporary art discourse. Her sculpture, video, installation and social practice explore ideas of race, beauty and community in visual and material culture. Leigh’s art addresses a wide swath of historical periods, geographies and traditions, with specific references to materials across the African diaspora, as well as forms traditionally associated with African art and architecture.This publication includes substantial new scholarship addressing Leigh’s work across mediums and topics. The volume, timed with the artist's first museum survey and national tour, includes contributions by her longtime collaborators, new scholars who add diverse insights and perspectives, and a conversation highlighting Leigh’s voice. Additionally, generous and lushly illustrated plates feature her critically acclaimed work for the 59th Venice Biennale and works made throughout her 20-year career. A special section featuring Leigh's research images gives access to Leigh’s research methodologies and encourages readers to fully engage with all aspects of Leigh’s work. This monograph provides a timely opportunity to gain a holistic understanding of the complex and profoundly moving work of this groundbreaking artist.


    Born in Chicago in 1967, Simone Leigh received a BA in fine art with a minor in philosophy from Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana, in 1990. In 2022, Leigh represented the United States at the 59th Venice Biennale with her critically acclaimed exhibition Sovereignty. She has had solo presentations at the Kitchen, New York (2012); Creative Time, New York (2014); New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (2016); Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2016); and the High Line, New York (2019); among other venues. Leigh lives and works in Brooklyn.

  • Mark Francis: You Are Art - Coloring Book
    Sold out

    The YOU ARE ART coloring book is based on the artworks from the 2022 DeLUXE Show YOU ARE ART: A Love Letter To 5th Ward solo show from myself, Mark Francis. This book was a collaborative effort featuring images captured by me in 5th Ward Houston, Texas, then translated to illustrations created by my son Damon Francis, and edited by our business manager Vernique Hutchinson Francis. We hope you enjoy this coloring book as much as we enjoyed creating it.

    We must let you know that a portion of the proceeds from this book will go toward purchasing art supplies for arts programs in the 5th Ward. It is paramount that the creative arts are supported in all communities, but especially in communities of color and that is what we plan to do.

    All books will be available to ship out from Houston, Texas, or picked up locally no later than 12/5/22

    PAGE Qty: 26
    DIMENSIONS: L 8.5in x W .13in x H 11
    WEIGHT: 7 oz

    PLEASE NOTE ALL SALES ARE FINAL. IN THE EVENT OF RECEIVING A DAMAGED PACKAGE YOU MAY BE ASKED TO PROVIDE PHOTOGRAPHIC EVIDENCE SO WE MAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH OUR PARCEL SERVICE.

  • Pharrell-isms

    by Pharrell Williams

    Sold out

    An essential, inspiring collection of quotations about creativity, social justice, and more from musician, producer, artist, and designer Pharrell Williams

    Rising to global fame with his hit single “Happy,” Pharrell Williams has influenced every corner of music, from cowriting and producing the monumental track “Alright” with Kendrick Lamar to composing music for the Academy Award–winning film Hidden Figures. But his work also extends to fashion, design, and the visual arts, and he has collaborated with leading artists and designers, including Takashi Murakami, Daniel Arsham, and Comme des Garçons. Gathered from interviews and other sources, this compelling and provocative collection of quotations offers new insights into the personality and creative process of one of today’s most exciting and intriguing artists.

    Select quotations from the book:

    • Self-awareness is a muscle that needs exercise. It needs a regimen.
    • You’ve got to continue to reinvent yourself today, all the while thinking about tomorrow.
    • Music is the key, the skeleton key that’s opened every door for me.
    • There is no humanity without education. There is no education without demand.
    • The only way to make life better for yourself, the only true and lasting way, is to make life better for others.
  • Our Kindred Home: Herbal Recipes, Plant Wisdom, and Seasonal Rituals for Rekindling Connection with the Earth

    Alyson Morgan

    $25.00
    Learn to reconnect with plants and nature for collective healing in a world beset by environmental crisis with this herbalism and eco-activist handbook.

    Alyson Morgan, a second-generation Haitian American, grew up feeling disconnected from her roots and suffering from the trauma of racism. To heal herself, she found a connection with the natural world around her: slowing down, respecting the seasons, and growing or foraging plants in her local area. To Alyson, connection with the earth means finding a sense of place and home in an era of stress and overwhelm. Now she shares her methods of homesteading for anyone to practice in their own life. Beautifully photographed, with plant monographs, illustrations, and recipes, Our Kindred Home explores our deep ties to the natural world and offers regenerative and sustainable ways of living. 

    Alyson helps readers better understand the deep grief and systemic harm that stems from disconnection with nature, and provides pathways for healing, such as: 
    • An exploration of ecological grief and its impacts
    • Information for working with subtle body energy
    • Tools for observing, identifying, foraging, and cultivating plants
    • Methods for creating infusions, honeys, vinegars, and oils
    • More than 80 seasonal and 40 plant monographs

    With the whole world in environmental crisis, creating a relationship with the earth that is reciprocal rather than exploitative and understanding our fundamental interconnectedness is more vital than ever. In Our Kindred Home, you'll find everyday ways to connect to the earth for resilience, resistance, liberation, and collective healing.
  • Virgil Abloh. Nike. ICONS

    by Virgil Abloh

    $80.00
    From Air Jordan 1 to Air Presto, Nike and Virgil Abloh reinvented sneaker culture with their project, The Ten. Experience engineering ingenuity and Abloh’s investigative design process: each shoe is a piece of industrial design and a readymade sculpture. The binding on ICONS showcases an open spine, reflecting Abloh’s design philosophy.

    In 2016, sportswear manufacturer Nike and fashion designer Virgil Abloh joined forces to create a sneaker collection celebrating 10 of the Oregon-based company’s most iconic shoes. With their project The Ten—which reimagined icons like Air Jordan 1, Air Max 90, Air Force 1, and Air Presto, among others—they reinvigorated sneaker culture.

    Virgil Abloh’s designs offer deep insights into engineering ingenuity and burst with cultural cachet. Drawing on the genius of the original shoe using lettering, ironic labels, collage, and sculpting techniques, Abloh played with language and sculptural elements to construct new meaning. Inspired by the wit of Dadaism, architectural theory, and avant-garde happenings, he analyzed what makes each shoe iconic and deconstructed it into an artistic assemblage, making each shoe into a piece of industrial design, a readymade sculpture, and a wearable all at once.

    ICONS traces Abloh’s investigative, creative process through documentation of the prototypes, original text messages from Abloh to Nike designers, and treasures from the Nike archives. We find Swooshes sliced away from Air Jordans and reapplied with tape or thread, Abloh’s typical text fragments in quotation marks on Air Force 1, and All Stars cut into pieces. We take a look behind the scenes and witness Abloh’s DIY approach, which gave each model in the Off-WhiteTM c/o Nike collection its own unique touch. His deconstructive vocabulary is reflected in the Swiss binding, which showcases an open spine and discloses the production of the book.

    The book documents Abloh’s cooperative way of working and reaffirms the power of print. For its design Nike and Abloh partnered with the acclaimed London-based design studio Zak Group. Together they conceived a two-part compendium, equal parts catalog and conceptual toolbox. The first part of the book presents a visual culture of sneakers while a lexicon in the second part defines the key people, places, objects, ideas, materials, and scenes from which the project grew. Texts by Nike’s Nicholas Schonberger, writer Troy Patterson, curator and historian Glenn Adamson, and Virgil Abloh himself frame the collaborative work within fashion and design history. A foreword by Hiroshi Fujiwara places the project within the historical continuum of Nike collaborators.

  • Omar Ba

    Omar Ba

    $42.00

    Ba’s densely textured paintings intertwine African and European histories to explore the corrupting effects of wealth and power and their impacts on communities

    This is the first monograph on Dakar- and New York–based mixed-media painter Omar Ba (born 1977), whose surreal scenes of violence and fantasy draw from a wide and often dark portfolio of themes: despotic warlords of the present, traditional folklore, colonial oppression and the pharaohs of ancient Egypt. His most abiding theme is the experiences of Black communities, both within America and across the globe. Ba articulates all these narrative threads through a densely textured visual language, applying oil, gouache, crayon and India ink onto rough, readymade surfaces such as corrugated cardboard. After preparing uniform backgrounds rendered in black paint, Ba populates the scenes with an abundance of fantastical beings—part human, part animal or plant.

  • Ralph Ellison: Photographer
    $60.00

    The first ever book on Ellison's lifelong photography practice, from New York scenes to domestic vignettes

    Ralph Ellison is a leading figure in American literature, hailed for his seminal novel Invisible Man (1952), a breakthrough representation of the American experience and Black everyday life. Lesser known, however, is his lifelong engagement with photography. Photographer is the first book dedicated to Ellison’s extensive work in the medium, which spans the 1930s to the ’90s.
    Throughout his life, photography played multiple roles for Ellison: a hobby, a source of income, a notetaking tool and an artistic outlet. During his formative years in New York City in the 1940s, he keenly photographed his surroundings—at times alongside fellow photographer Gordon Parks—with many images serving as field notes for his writing. In the last decades of his life, as he grappled with his much-anticipated second novel, Ellison turned inward, and he studied his private universe at home with a Polaroid camera. At all times his photography reveals an artist steeped in modernist thinking who embraced experimentation to interpret the world around him, particularly Black life in America. In a 1956 letter to fellow writer Albert Murray, Ellison underscored photography’s importance to his creative process: “You know me, I have to have something between me and reality when I’m dealing with it most intensely.” Accompanying the photographs in this book are several essays situating Ellison’s work within his broader career as a writer, as well an excerpt from his 1977 essay “The Little Man at Chehaw Station: The American Artist and His Audience.”
    Ralph Ellison was born in Oklahoma City in 1913. His love of music led him to enroll at Booker T. Washington’s Tuskegee Institute in Macon County, Alabama, as a music major. In 1936 he visited New York City, where he befriended established authors and intellectuals who encouraged him to pursue a career in writing. He joined the Federal Writers’ Project and began contributing essays and short stories for publications such as New Masses, The Negro Quarterly, New Republic and Saturday Review. By 1945 he had signed a contract to write what was to become Invisible Man (1952); it won the National Book Award in 1953 but remained his only novel published during his lifetime. He published two subsequent collections of essays, Shadow and Act (1964) and Going to the Territory (1986). For many years Ellison worked on a second novel, which he never completed; its central narrative was published posthumously as Three Days Before the Shooting... (2010). Ellison died in 1994.

  • Kehinde Wiley: The Archaeology of Silence

    edited by Claudia Schmuckli

    $50.00

    “That is the archaeology I am unearthing: the specter of police violence and state control over the bodies of young Black and brown people all over the world.” –Kehinde Wiley

    Kehinde Wiley: An Archaeology of Silence features a new body of paintings and sculptures by American artist Kehinde Wiley confronting the legacies of colonialism through the visual language of the fallen figure. It expands on a subject the artist first explored in his 2008 series Down—a group of large-scale portraits of young Black men inspired by Wiley’s encounter with Hans Holbein the Younger’s The Dead Christ in the Tomb (1521–22) at the Kunstmuseum Basel. Holbein’s painting triggered an ongoing investigation into the iconography of death and sacrifice in Western art that Wiley traced across religious, mythological and historical subjects. An Archaeology of Silence extends these considerations to include men and women around the world whose senseless deaths, often unacknowledged or silenced, are transformed into a powerful elegy of global resistance against state-sanctioned violence. The resulting paintings of Black bodies struck down, wounded or dead, all referencing iconic historical paintings of slain heroes, martyrs or saints, offer a haunting meditation on the violence against Black and brown bodies through the lens of European art history.
    Kehinde Wiley (born 1977) is a world-renowned visual artist. Working in the mediums of painting, sculpture and video, Wiley is best known for his vibrant portrayals of contemporary African American and African-diasporic individuals that subvert the hierarchies and conventions of European and American portraiture. Wiley became the first African American artist to paint an official US Presidential portrait for former US President Barack Obama. Wiley has held solo exhibitions throughout the United States and internationally, and his works are included in the collections of over 40 public institutions worldwide. He lives and works in Beijing, Dakar and New York.

  • Pre-Order:Where Is Africa: Volume 1

    edited by Anita N. Bateman and Emanuel Admassu

    $35.00

    Pre-order.  Ships on November 21, 2023

    A multidisciplinary illustrated reader unpacking imperialist representations of Africa by promoting dialogue, memory and everyday practice, and reimagining cultural institutions and the arts—from museums to academia, from architecture to art.

    In 2017, curator and art historian Anita N. Bateman and architect and professor Emanuel Admassu initiated research on the traditional positioning and mispositioning of the arts across the African continent. Where Is Africa has been an extended set of exchanges with contemporary artists, curators, designers and academics who are actively engaged in representing the continent—both within and outside its geographic boundaries. By examining artist collectives, new currents in art history and the rise of contemporary art festivals in and about Africa from the past 10 years, the project unpacks the imperialist foundations of cultural institutions and their anthropological fascination with African objects, people and places.

    The interviews in Where Is Africa examine African and African-diasporic identities and spaces through questions of positionality in relation to specific disciplinary, cultural and political contexts. The texts address Afro-diasporic aesthetic practices and the curatorial, museological and artistic matrices that confront epistemologies of dominance and exclusion. The commissioned essays and images offer concise methodologies that expand or complicate issues addressed by the interviewees.

    Where Is Africa is a conceptual project that accompanies a conceptual place, driven by the desire to dislodge Africa from categorical fixity and the representational logics of nation-states. Africa can never be fully enclosed by the residue of colonial violence or the totalitarian gaze of neoliberalism; instead, it creates infinite malleability, where place and concept are untethered from each other.

    Contributors include: Mikael Awake, Salome Asega, Tau Tavengwa, Anthony Bogues, Jay Simple, Eric Gottesman, Rebecca Corey, Aida Mulkozi, Rakeb Sile, Mesai Haileleul, Mpho Matsipa, Naiama Safia Sandy, Adama Delphine Fawundu, Rehema Chachage, Robel Temesgen, Valerie Amani, Meskerem Assegued, Elias Sime, Olalekan Jeyifous, Amanda Williams, Germane Barnes and Mario Gooden.

  • The Sexual Politics of Black Churches by Josef Sorett
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    This book brings together an interdisciplinary roster of scholars and practitioners to analyze the politics of sexuality within Black churches and the communities they serve. In essays and conversations, leading writers reflect on how Black churches have participated in recent discussions about issues such as marriage equality, reproductive justice, and transgender visibility in American society. They consider the varied ways that Black people and groups negotiate the intersections of religion, race, gender, and sexuality across historical and contemporary settings.

    Individually and collectively, the pieces included in this book shed light on the relationship between the cultural politics of Black churches and the broader cultural and political terrain of the United States. Contributors examine how churches and their members participate in the formal processes of electoral politics as well as how they engage in other processes of social and cultural change. They highlight how contemporary debates around marriage, gender, and sexuality are deeply informed by religious beliefs and practices.

    Through a critically engaged interdisciplinary investigation, The Sexual Politics of Black Churches develops an array of new perspectives on religion, race, and sexuality in American culture.
  • Afro-Fabulations: The Queer Drama of Black Life

    by Tavia Nyong'o

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    In Afro-Fabulations: The Queer Drama of Black Life, cultural critic and historian Tavia Nyong’o surveys the conditions of contemporary black artistic production in the era of post-blackness. Moving fluidly between the insurgent art of the 1960’s and the intersectional activism of the present day, Afro-Fabulations challenges genealogies of blackness that ignore its creative capacity to exceed conditions of traumatic loss, social death, and archival erasure.

    If black survival in an anti-black world often feels like a race against time, Afro-Fabulations looks to the modes of memory and imagination through which a queer and black polytemporality is invented and sustained. Moving past the antirelational debates in queer theory, Nyong’o posits queerness as “angular sociality,” drawing upon queer of color critique in order to name the gate and rhythm of black social life as it moves in and out of step with itself. He takes up a broad range of sites of analysis, from speculative fiction to performance art, from artificial intelligence to Blaxploitation cinema. Reading the archive of violence and trauma against the grain, Afro-Fabulations summons the poetic powers of queer world-making that have always been immanent to the fight and play of black life.
  • The Black Family Reunion Cookbook: Recipes and Food Memories by The National Council of Negro Women
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    Inspired by the Black Family Reunion Celebrations, held in seven cities every summer, this book reflects the local, national, and international heritage of the African American community. With first-person reminiscences and recipes from celebrities like Wilma Rudolph, Natalie Cole, Esther Rolle, and Patti LaBelle, this cookbook offers a delightful diversity of over 250 dishes. Line drawings throughout.
  • Radical Justice: Lifting Every Voice

    by Accra Shepp

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    *Ships in 7-10 Business Days*

    Radical Justice brings together two bodies of socially-engaged photographic portraiture by Accra Shepp, who has documented New York City’s Occupy Wall Street movement starting in 2011 and its racial justice/BLM protests since 2020.  

    Working in the style of August Sander with a large format camera and black and white film, Shepp pictures fellow New Yorkers on their city’s streets in acts of sit-ins and active protest, both unplanned and highly organized, both independent and unified, to address notions of the 99% and 1%, which have become part of the American political vernacular.  Bearing witness to defining events of the last decade that echo the United States’ longer historical arch, Shepp’s empathetic depictions of fellow citizens standing up for the fair protection of the Constitution provide a prophetic mirror of current events, which reflects back centuries to where the American experiment began, to suggest where we’ll find ourselves in the years to come.

  • Jamel Shabazz: Albums
    $50.00

    Photo albums from the archives of the iconic chronicler of New York's 1980s rap, hip-hop and Black culture

    The influential Brooklyn-based photographer Jamel Shabazz has been making portraits of New Yorkers for more than 40 years, creating an archive of cultural shifts and struggles across the city. His portraits of different communities underscore the street as a space for self-presentation, whether through fashion or pose. In every instance Shabazz aims, in his words, to represent individuals and communities with “honor and dignity.” This book—awarded the Gordon Parks Foundation/Steidl Book Prize—presents, for the first time, Shabazz’s work from the 1970s to ’90s as it exists in his archive: small prints thematically grouped and sequenced in traditional family photo albums that function as portable portfolios.
    Shabazz began making portraits in the mid-1970s in Brooklyn, Queens, the West Village and Harlem. His camera was also at his side while working as an officer at Rikers Island in the 1980s, where he took portraits of inmates. This book features selections from over a dozen albums, many previously unseen, and includes his earliest photographs as well as images taken inside Rikers Island, all accompanied by essays that situate Shabazz’s work within the broader history of photography.
    Born and raised in Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz (born 1960) picked up his first camera at the age of 15 and began documenting his communities, inspired by photographers such as Leonard Freed, James Van Der Zee and Gordon Parks. His work has been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions, including those at the Brooklyn Museum, the Studio Museum in Harlem, the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Shabazz is the author of Back in the Days (2001) and Sights in the City (2017).

  • Maxwell Alexandre: Pardo é Papel: The Glorious Victory and New Power

    edited by Alessandra Gómez

    $49.00

    On Alexandre’s politically nuanced painting cycle affirming Black iconicity

    Published for his first North American solo exhibition, this catalog presents Brazilian artist Maxwell Alexandre’s (born 1990) ongoing series Pardo é Papel. Suspended from the ceiling, Alexandre’s large-scale paintings portray striking scenes of communal leisure interspersed with religious and art-historical imagery. Pop-cultural symbols appear alongside these images, including depictions of Black cultural icons such as Beyoncé, Nina Simone and Elza Soares, and commercial products from his childhood such as popular plastic blue Capri pools, Danone yogurt and the chocolate drink Toddynho. Alexandre paints his Black subjects on brown craft paper—pardo, in Portuguese. Although the main series title translates directly as “brown is paper” to reference the pardo paper itself, historically the term holds double significance as an ambiguous racial category in Brazil. Alexandre uses pardo paper to affirm and empower Blackness.

  • When We See Us: A Century of Black Figuration in Painting

    edited by Koyo Kouoh

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    This landmark publication accompanies an international touring exhibition devoted to Black figuration in painting from the 1920s to now, featuring artists from Africa and the African diaspora.

    Published to accompany a major exhibition at Zeitz MOCAA, CapeTown, When We See Us presents a comprehensive exploration of Black representation through portraiture and figuration, celebrating Black subjectivity and Black consciousness from Pan-African and Pan-Diasporic perspectives.

    In the past decade, figurative painting by Black artists has risento a new prominence in the field of contemporary art. This timely and revelatory book highlights the many ways in which artists critically engage with notions of blackness, contributing to the critical discourse on topics such as Pan-Africanism, the Civil Rights Movement, African Liberation and Independence movements, the Anti-Apartheid and Black Consciousness mobilizations, Decoloniality, and Black Lives Matter.

    With a primary focus on figurative painting, When We See Us explores how Black artists have imagined, positioned, memorialized, and asserted African and African diasporic experiences from the early 20th century to the present day. Featuring more than 200 works of art—and contributions from well-known writers such as Ken Bugul, Maaza Mengiste, Robin Coste Lewis, and Bill Kouelany—When We See Us is a major contribution to our understanding of Black art that will appeal to anyone interested in modern and contemporary figurative art and Black cultural history.

  • Afrofuturism: A History of Black Futures

    edited by Kevin M. Strait & Kinshasha Holman Conwill

    $29.95

    This timely and gorgeously illustrated companion book to an upcoming Smithsonian exhibition explores the power of Afrofuturism to reclaim the past and reimagine Black futures

    Afrofuturism: A History of Black Futures explores the evolving and exhilarating concept of Afrofuturism, a lens used to imagine a more empowering future for the Black community through music, art, and speculative fiction. Sumptuous, beautifully designed spreads feature 100 gorgeous illustrations of objects and images that reflect Black identity, agency, creativity, and hope, including: T’Challa’s suit from Black Panther, Octavia Butler’s typewriter, Uhura’s outfit from Star Trek, Sun Ra’s space harp, costumes from Broadway’s The Wiz, handwritten lyrics by Jimi Hendrix, and Janelle Monae’s ArchAndroid dress.

    Chapters include essays from a diverse group of scholars who reflect on themes such as legacy, alienation, and activism, with profiles on influential people and objects:  

    • Foreword & Introduction: Provides background on Afrofuturism 
    • Chapter 1 - Space is the Place: Reflects on space and its defining connection to Afrofuturism and its African cultural legacy 
    • Chapter 2 - Speculative Worlds: Explores short stories, Black speculative fiction and sci-fi, comics, and Black superheroes as bastions of Afrofuturist expression
    • Chapter 3 - Visualizing Afrofuturism: Analyzes the vast visual culture of Afrofuturism
    • Chapter 4 - Musical Futures: Explores Afrofuturism and music
    • Afterword
    Afrofuturism offers a framework of radical potential to envision Black liberation and alternatives to oppressive structures like white supremacy. Afrofuturism comes at a time of increasing visibility for the concept, both in scholarship and in pop culture, and is a compelling ode to the revolutionary power of Black imagination.

    CONTRIBUTORS: Reynaldo Anderson, Tiffany E. Barber, Herb Boyd, Ariana Curtis,Eve L. Ewing, Tuliza Fleming, Nona Hendryx, N. K. Jemisin, JohnJennings, Steven Lewis, Mark Anthony Neal, Alondra Nelson, DeNichols, Elaine Nichols, William S. Pretzer, Vernon Reid, MatthewShindell, Kevin M. Strait, Angela Tate, Michelle Wilkinson, Ytasha L.Womack, Alisha B. Wormsley, and Kevin Young
  • The Black Technical Object: On Machine Learning and the Aspiration of Black Being by Ramon Amaro
    $25.00

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    On the abstruse nature of machine learning, mathematics, and the deep incursion of racial hierarchy.

    To impair the racial ordering of the world, The Black Technical Object introduces the history of statistical analysis and “scientific” racism into research on machine learning. Computer programming designed for taxonomic patterning, machine learning offers useful insights into racism and racist behavior, but its connection to the racial history of science and the Black lived experience has yet to be developed. In this book, Ramon Amaro explores how the history of data and statistical analysis informs the complex relationship between race and machine learning. He juxtaposes a practical analysis of this type of computerized learning with a theory of Black alienation in order to inspire alternative approaches to contemporary algorithmic practice. In doing so, Amaro contemplates the abstruse nature of programming and mathematics, as well as the deep incursion of racial hierarchies.

    Series Overview: In the decades that followed the demise of decolonial struggles and the end of the USSR, a great deal of intellectual effort was devoted to conceptualizing political emancipation as freedom from the masses rather than freedom for the masses. Focusing on connectivity rather than on collectivity, these modalities of political action led to depoliticizing effects and to a certain counter-political ethos expressed in terms such as parapolitics, psychopolitics, or micropolitics, all which this series terms “antipolitical.” Rather than counter the arguments that each term puts forth, On the Antipolitical, edited by Ana Teixeira Pinto, suggests historizing this disposition, situating it within the neocolonial continuum that animates the digital frontier as the new locus of settler becoming.

  • Feminism

    by Bernardine Evaristo

    $15.00

    Ships in 7-10 business days

    Feminism is a powerful new interpretation of British art from an intersectional feminist perspective, penned by one of Britain’s greatest writers

    “Art museums have long drawn me into their spaces. The infinite possibilities of the language of art opens me up to methods of communication quite unlike my own. I am fascinated by the most interesting and adventurous artists, who are surely among the most innovative thinkers on the planet. I am in awe of their talent and endless inventiveness, and my imagination is nourished by theirs. I am challenged to think differently about how we might understand, recreate, reshape, reimagine life itself—animate, inanimate, spirit. My senses are stimulated, my emotions stirred, my brain whirs away in the background and I feel very much alive. When I was invited to write this book, my first time writing about art, I immediately knew that I would turn my attention on women and womxn (to include non-binary people) of color in British art because, similar to the story throughout the arts, either as creator or curator, we haven’t been very visible. This book is personal—about the art I’ve seen, and the art I’ve loved—and my interpretation of the art in the national collection and beyond, from an intersectional feminist perspective.”

  • Decolonizing Design: A Cultural Justice Guidebook

    by Elizabeth (Dori) Tunstall

    $22.95

    A guidebook to the institutional transformation of design theory and practice by restoring the long-excluded cultures of Indigenous, Black, and People of Color communities.

    From the excesses of world expositions to myths of better living through technology, modernist design, in its European-based guises, has excluded and oppressed the very people whose lands and lives it reshaped. Decolonizing Design first asks how modernist design has encompassed and advanced the harmful project of colonization—then shows how design might address these harms by recentering its theory and practice in global Indigenous cultures and histories.

    A leading figure in the movement to decolonize design, Dori Tunstall uses hard-hitting real-life examples and case studies drawn from over fifteen years of working to transform institutions to better reflect the lived experiences of Indigenous, Black, and People of Color communities. Her book is at once enlightening, inspiring, and practical, interweaving her lived experiences with extensive research to show what decolonizing design means, how it heals, and how to practice it in our institutions today.

    For leaders and practitioners in design institutions and communities, Tunstall’s work demonstrates how we can transform the way we imagine and remake the world, replacing pain and repression with equity, inclusion, and diversity—in short, she shows us how to realize the infinite possibilities that decolonized design represents.

  • A Movement in Every Direction: Legacies of the Great Migration

    by Jessica Bell Brown & Ryan N. Dennis

    $45.00
    Contemporary artists and writers reflect on the Great Migration and the ways that it continues to inform the Black experience in America

    Contemporary artists and writers reflect on the Great Migration and the ways that it continues to inform the Black experience in America

    The Great Migration (1915–70) saw more than six million African Americans leave the South for destinations across the United States. This incredible dispersal of people across the country transformed nearly every aspect of Black life and culture. Offering a new perspective on this historical phenomenon, this incisive volume presents immersive photography of newly commissioned works of art by Akea, Mark Bradford, Zoë Charlton, Larry W. Cook, Torkwase Dyson, Theaster Gates Jr., Allison Janae Hamilton, Leslie Hewitt, Steffani Jemison, Robert Pruitt, Jamea Richmond-Edwards, and Carrie Mae Weems. The artists investigate their connections to the Deep South through familial stories of perseverance, self-determination, and self-reliance and consider how this history informs their working practices. Essays by Kiese Laymon, Jessica Lynne, Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts, and Willie Jamaal Wright explore how the Great Migration continues to reverberate today in the public and private spheres and examine migration as both a historical and a political consequence, as well as a possibility for reclaiming agency.


    Published in association with the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Mississippi Museum of Art

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